craftwork

(redirected from craftworker)

craft·work

 (krăft′wûrk′)
n.
Work made or done by craftspeople.

craft′work′er n.

craftwork

(ˈkrɑːftˌwɜːk)
pl n
1. (Crafts) works of artistry or craft
2. (Crafts) the practice of a craft
References in periodicals archive ?
Nancy Flett, renown Spokane tribal historian and craftworker (now deceased) explained her interpretation of overall designs.
DW looks at the booming sector, which is seen as key to Europe's largest economy.The skilled craftworker's services are called on millions of times daily in Germany.
Despite last year's surgery leaving her unable to drive, Lucy - now a selfemployed craftworker - was determined to show up, rain or shine, at 30 events across the country.
The fact that 50% of AT&T's work force during the late 1960s and early 1970s were women, at the same time that women were almost totally absent from management or craftworker positions, was assumed to be prima facie evidence that AT&T had discriminated against them.
The Craftworker's Market, Writer's Digest Books, 9933 Alliance Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242.
We have lost sight of "The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century." Braverman's point of departure was the craftworker who obtains fulfillment through the creation of objects first conceived in the imagination.
The subject of this feature is a beautifully crafted picture frame with quilled and beaded portrait image made in 2008 by Deborah Magee, a Piegan (Pikunni) Blackfeet craftworker from the Blackfeet Reservation at Browning, Montana.
A spokesman for Kirklees Building Services said: "The benefit that apprenticeship training gives us as a business is that the skills that our current workforce possess are passed onto the next generation of craftworker and this helps us to maintain a good quality of workmanship.
By this we mean the region into which a craftworker will bring a small workpiece (whenever possible) a foot or so in front of the eyes for precise, comfortable depth perception, and in easy reach of both hands.
Similarly, if one looks carefully at Braverman's attitude toward traditional craftwork, there is a sense in which his alleged romanticization of the craftworker represents a strength rather than a weakness in his analysis.