crammed


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cram

 (krăm)
v. crammed, cram·ming, crams
v.tr.
1. To force, press, or squeeze (something) into an insufficient or barely sufficient space; stuff.
2.
a. To feed a large amount of food to (an animal).
b. To fill (oneself or one's stomach, for example) with food.
v.intr.
1. To move into and fully occupy a space: The students crammed into the tiny classroom.
2. To study hastily for an impending examination: was up all night cramming for the history midterm.
n.
Hasty study for an imminent examination.

[Middle English crammen, from Old English crammian; see ger- in Indo-European roots.]

cram′mer n.

crammed

(kræmd)
adj
bursting or overflowing
Translations
namačkaný
proppet
täyteen ahdettu
natrpan
詰め込んだ
빼곡히 찬
fullproppad
อย่างแออัด
nhồi nhét

crammed

[ˈkræmd] adj
(= bursting) to be crammed with sth [place] → être bourré(e) de qch
Her bag was crammed with books → Son sac était bourré de livres.
(= packed) to be crammed into [people, things] → être entassé(e) dans

crammed

مَحْشو namačkaný proppet vollgestopft στριμωγμένος atiborrado täyteen ahdettu comble natrpan pieno zeppo 詰め込んだ 빼곡히 찬 propvol stappfull nabity abarrotado, cheio заполненный fullproppad อย่างแออัด tıka basa dolu nhồi nhét 填满的
References in classic literature ?
For five weeks I crammed, until simultaneous quadratic equations and chemical formulas fairly oozed from my ears.
Prissy Andrews told me that she sat up half the night every night of her Entrance week and crammed for dear life; and I had determined to sit up AT LEAST as long as she did.
They said the theatre would be crammed, because Frezzolini was going to sing.
Smaller dogs that did not fight much were crammed two or more into single crates.
The shop was crammed with customers, and there were crowds of mice upon the biscuit canisters.