cranefly


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Related to cranefly: mosquito hawk, Tipulidae, Mosquito eater
Translations

cranefly

[ˈkreɪnflaɪ] Ntípula f

cranefly

crane fly [ˈkreɪnflaɪ] n (= daddy longlegs) → tipule f

cranefly

nSchnake f
References in periodicals archive ?
Peter Boardman, from the Cranefly Reporting Scheme, said Tipula paludosa is one of 338 types of craneflies in the UK.
Then one day he meets a cranefly (daddy-long-legs) who is desperate to get to the lights and party because it is his last day.
In field conditions, they infect mainly the soil-dwelling forms of insects such as caterpillars, cutworms, crown borers, grubs, corn root worms, cranefly, thrips, fungus gnat, and beetles (Miles et al., 2012), and few other soil arthropods.
| September - The annual emergence of the common cranefly, known as the daddy-long-legs, and important food for birds and bats, largely failed again.
Some shredders, including Gammams amphipods, have enzymes that facilitate digestion of lignin and lignocellulose (potentially acquired by consuming fungi, Barlocher and Porter, 1986) whereas other shredders (e.g., cranefly larvae in the genus Tipula) have a more alkaline midgut that may minimize the impact of tannins and other compounds that inhibit invertebrate feeding (Martin et al, 1980; Barlocher and Porter, 1986).
The Cranefly Orchid is the most widespread orchid found in Mississippi, but it is often overlooked because it is well camouflaged in its wooded habitat.
Stomach contents of the single California Myotis collected in winter included 1 winter cranefly (Diptera: Trichoceridae), evidence that it had been foraging.
Selection of entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae, Nematoda) for the biological control of cranefly larvae Tipula paludosa (Tipulidae, Diptera).
A badger's diet consists of around 50% worms and the rest is made up of leatherjackets (cranefly larvae), chafer grubs and other insect larvae, the majority of which can be found in lawns and short grass.
lutarium consumed dragonfly larvae, damselfly larvae, tadpoles, snails; however, it did not consume cranefly larvae or small fish.
Some species have already disappeared, including beetles Anthicus bimaculatus and Asaphidion pallipes, last seen in the early 1980s, the cranefly Nephrotoma quadristriata and the snail-killing fly Pherbellia grisescens last spotted in 1966.
The title of each book in the series is named for a plant that grows on Martha's Vineyard: "Deadly Nightshade," "The Cranefly Orchid Murders," "The Cemetery Yew," "Jack in the Pulpit," "The Paperwhite Narcissus" and "Indian Pipes." The Victoria Trumbull mystery series is published by St.