craniectomy

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cra·ni·ec·to·my

 (krā′nē-ĕk′tə-mē)
n. pl. cra·ni·ec·to·mies
Surgical removal of a portion of the cranium.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

craniectomy

(ˌkreɪnɪˈɛktəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
the surgical removal of a part of the skull to facilitate brain surgery, the bone then being discarded rather than replaced
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

craniectomy

Surgery to remove part of the skull.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
The company added that Bioplate's titanium fixation screws can be used in conjunction with the IFS tabs, or the entire fixation system can be used by surgeons for routine craniectomies and facial reconstructions.
Posterior fossa craniotomies and craniectomies are commonly used by neurosurgeons to approach infratentorial lesions.
For patients with decompressive craniectomies, only 10% of physiotherapists (n=5/52) reported that they would commence mobility without a helmet.
These often result from trauma in the form of skull fractures leading to bone loss or decompressive craniectomies to control raised intracranial pressure.
Clinical significance of positive cranial bone flap cultures and associated risk of surgical site infection after craniotomies or craniectomies. J Neurosurg.
Epilepsy in patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarcts and decompressive craniectomies. Epilepsy Res 2015;112:130-136.
In some of the cases for urgent decompressive craniectomies, the patients did not have a GCS taken in the ED because of the severity of their injury; therefore, obtaining blood alcohol screening in the ED may not have been feasible.
The management included more neurosurgical interventions as craniotomies and decompressive craniectomies for refractory intracranial hypertension cases.
Some authors suggest that large craniectomies convert the cranium from a closed box to an open cavity which alters the brain pathophysiology.
To verify the robustness of these methods, data on small craniectomies, including posterior fossa and nondecompressive craniectomies, were also collected.
In other words, since craniectomy prevents malignant ICP increase, ONSD normal values in the two craniectomies are actually the proof of concept that OSND measurement is strongly related to ICP.