craniometry

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cra·ni·om·e·try

 (krā′nē-ŏm′ĭ-trē)
n.
Measurement of the skull to determine its characteristics as related to sex, race, or body type.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

craniometry

(ˌkreɪnɪˈɒmɪtrɪ)
n
(Physiology) the study and measurement of skulls
craniometric, ˌcranioˈmetrical adj
ˌcranioˈmetrically adv
ˌcraniˈometrist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cra•ni•om•e•try

(ˌkreɪ niˈɒm ɪ tri)

n.
the science of measuring skulls, chiefly to determine their characteristic relationship to sex, body type, or genetic population.
[1860–65]
cra`ni•o•met′ric (-əˈmɛ trɪk) cra`ni•o•met′ri•cal, adj.
cra`ni•o•met′ri•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

craniometry

the science of measuring skulls. — craniometrist, n.craniometric, craniometrical, adj.
See also: Head
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.craniometry - the branch of physical anthropology dealing with the study and measurement of dry skulls after removal of its soft parts
physical anthropology - the branch of anthropology dealing with the genesis and variation of human beings
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
To determine if such an identification bias can be equally detected with craniometrically derived estimates of admixture, we compared our sample subsets with known and unknown birthplaces for their level of indigeneity, as percent Native American ancestry, and for their ID status, as scored in the FDB.
If we let the known and unknown birthplace subsamples serve as a proxy for the identified and unidentified samples, our craniometrically derived results indicate increased indigeneity among the unknown birthplace sample, and replicate those ancestry trends previously reported by Hughes et al.
The point is that some populations are craniometrically specialised while others are not.