craniometry

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cra·ni·om·e·try

 (krā′nē-ŏm′ĭ-trē)
n.
Measurement of the skull to determine its characteristics as related to sex, race, or body type.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

craniometry

(ˌkreɪnɪˈɒmɪtrɪ)
n
(Physiology) the study and measurement of skulls
craniometric, ˌcranioˈmetrical adj
ˌcranioˈmetrically adv
ˌcraniˈometrist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cra•ni•om•e•try

(ˌkreɪ niˈɒm ɪ tri)

n.
the science of measuring skulls, chiefly to determine their characteristic relationship to sex, body type, or genetic population.
[1860–65]
cra`ni•o•met′ric (-əˈmɛ trɪk) cra`ni•o•met′ri•cal, adj.
cra`ni•o•met′ri•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

craniometry

the science of measuring skulls. — craniometrist, n.craniometric, craniometrical, adj.
See also: Head
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.craniometry - the branch of physical anthropology dealing with the study and measurement of dry skulls after removal of its soft parts
physical anthropology - the branch of anthropology dealing with the genesis and variation of human beings
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References in periodicals archive ?
(56) Bogdanov's own work was influenced by the noted French anthropologist and craniometrist Paul Broca (1824-80), who argued that brain size bore a direct relationship to intelligence.
Lummis does, however, reverse the traditional methodology of craniometrists, who linked the largeness of one's skull size to the degree of intellectual capability, (15) but he nonetheless retains the logic of such biological determinism by reading Faustino's professional capabilities in his physical features.
(25) One of the most renowned craniometrists of the day, Paul Broca, also performed a series of experiments that led to some problematic results in 1862.