craniopagus


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craniopagus

(ˌkreɪnɪˈɒpəɡəs)
n
(Medicine) the condition of Siamese twins joined at the head
References in periodicals archive ?
Montefiore Physicians Continue to Participate in Craniopagus Separations around the World
Parasitic twin, also known as craniopagus parasiticus, are formed the same way as conjoined twins during the early stages of pregnancy.
Sudan-born Rital and Ritag Gaboura were craniopagus twins, meaning they were born joined at the head.
The sisters, who were born in Khartoum, Sudan, have overcome incredible odds to survive - only one in ten million survive the rare condition of craniopagus.
The sisters, who were born in Khartoum, Sudan, have overcome incredible odds to survive - only one in 10m survive the rare condition of craniopagus.
Mokgokong, best known internationally as a specialist and lead surgeon in separating craniopagus Siamese twins, was pressed on a number of issues that have historically angered doctors and distanced them from the HPCSA.
ISLAMABAD, December 06, 2011 (Frontier Star): Managing Director Pakistan Bait-ul Maal (PBM), Zamurd Khan appealed the nation to pray for the successful surgery of the craniopagus twin girls started here on Thursday at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS).
In the past 72 years there have been 31 attempts to separate craniopagus twins--siblings fused at the cranium, the eight bones that make up the skull.
Craniopagus - Latin for ``fixed at the head'' - occurs in just 2 percent of those conjoined twins.
Craniopagus expert Benjamin Carson says 30 attempts have been made to separate twins but only seven children have survived.
Benjamin Carson, one of the world's most gifted surgeons, made medical history in 1987 when he performed the first successful separation of occipital craniopagus (joined at the head) Siamese twins.
Twins joined at the head are called craniopagus twins and are extremely rare, occurring in about 1 in 2.