cranky

(redirected from crankier)
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crank·y 1

 (krăng′kē)
adj. crank·i·er, crank·i·est
1. Having a bad disposition; peevish.
2. Having eccentric ways; odd.
3. Full of bends and turns; crooked: a cranky mountain road.
4. Working unpredictably; erratic: a cranky old truck.
5. Rickety; loose.

crank′i·ly adv.
crank′i·ness n.

crank·y 2

 (krăng′kē)
adj. crank·i·er, crank·i·est Nautical
Liable to capsize.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cranky

(ˈkræŋkɪ)
adj, crankier or crankiest
1. informal eccentric
2. chiefly informal US and Canadian and Irish fussy and bad-tempered
3. shaky; out of order
4. full of bends and turns
5. dialect unwell
ˈcrankily adv
ˈcrankiness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

crank•y1

(ˈkræŋ ki)

adj. crank•i•er, crank•i•est.
1. ill-tempered; grouchy.
2. eccentric; erratic.
3. shaky; malfunctioning.
4. full of bends or windings, as a road.
[1780–90]
crank′i•ly, adv.
crank′i•ness, n.

crank•y2

(ˈkræŋ ki)

adj. Naut.
[1835–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cranky - (used of boats) inclined to heel over easily under sail
boat - a small vessel for travel on water
unstable - lacking stability or fixity or firmness; "unstable political conditions"; "the tower proved to be unstable in the high wind"; "an unstable world economy"
2.cranky - easily irritated or annoyed; "an incorrigibly fractious young man"; "not the least nettlesome of his countrymen"
ill-natured - having an irritable and unpleasant disposition
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cranky

adjective (U.S., Canad., & Irish informal) eccentric, wacky (slang), oddball (informal), freakish, odd, strange, funny (informal), out there (slang), bizarre, peculiar, queer (informal), rum (Brit. slang), quirky, idiosyncratic, off-the-wall (slang), freaky (slang), outré, wacko or whacko (informal) Vegetarianism has shed its cranky image.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

cranky

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
شاذ الأطْوار
potrhlýrozmrzelývýstřední
irritabelmærkeligsær
äreäärtyisä
ćudljivhirovit
undarlegur; önugur
malmostosostravagante

cranky

[ˈkræŋkɪ] ADJ (crankier (compar) (crankiest (superl))) (= strange) [idea, person] → excéntrico (US) (= bad-tempered) → malhumorado, enojón (LAm)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cranky

[ˈkræŋki] adj
(= eccentric) [idea] → excentrique, loufoque
(US) (= bad-tempered) → grincheux/euse, revêche
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cranky

adj (+er)
(= eccentric)verrückt
(esp US: = bad-tempered) → griesgrämig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cranky

[ˈkræŋkɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (strange, ideas, people) → eccentrico/a, strambo/a
to be cranky (bad-tempered) → avere i nervi
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

crank

(krӕŋk) noun
a person with strange or odd ideas.
ˈcranky adjective
ˈcrankiness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

cranky

a. majadero-a; inquieto-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Hormonal changes and the discomfort of carrying a child could have made her crankier than normal.
It is certain that everything is coming to an end." As he grew older, crankier, and more and more ridden with sickness and pain, he came to see the world as the mirror image of himself--an old, gray-haired man.
(37.) I do mean creakier, not crankier, but there may have been an uptick in crankiness too.
I woke up feeling crankier than usual just a day or two after downloading (https://myflotracker.com/) MyFLO created by nutritionist Alisa Vitti, founder of FLOliving.com.
They say the older people get, the crankier they become.
"I suppose, when you get a bit older, you do get a bit crankier!" Goold laughs.
Advise parents to travel with snacks and a simple meal (peanut butter sandwiches are our standby) because sometimes food won't be available for immediate purchase, and restless hungry children are much crankier than simply restless children.
LAPD cold case investigator Harry Bosch has gotten older and crankier at the same rate I have, so I always look forward to each new chapter in his saga, largely to see what new life lessons I might learn from my unwitting role model.
"It's all-consuming now,'' he said, "and I think I've gotten crankier through the years.''
My guess, though, is that others, the crankier or more motivated, have continued to do bits and pieces of their own thing.