crate-train

crate-train

(krāt′trān′)
tr.v. crate-trained, crate-train·ing, crate-trains
To cause (a dog) to become adapted to being kept for extended periods in a crate, especially as a means of housebreaking.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Think about the arrangements, like where the dog is going to sleep, the schedule for taking the dog out and whether you would like to crate-train, but be flexible," says Dr.
He's crate-trained, almost fully housebroken, knows how to sit and is learning to fetch.
A crate-trained dog always has a familiar retreat to call his own, whether at home, when travelling, or while waiting his turn at a weekly training class or performance event.
QI CRATE-trained my ten-month-old German Shepherd and although I don't put him in a crate any longer he often goes there of his own accord if I do something he doesn't like such as vacuuming or going shopping.
Taajub scored over course and distance six days ago but the Peter Crate-trained five-year-old must overcome another big field with a 6lb penalty if he is to land the spoils.
Although she housebroke and crate-trained easily, she is very strong-willed and full of strange behavior at home.
Animals that are crate-trained may feel safest in their crate, possibly with a blanket over the top to muffle noise and block flashing lights from fireworks.
She is already house-trained, crate-trained and knows several commands, including "sit," thanks to her foster parents.
Silly is not crate-trained and is not comfortable being confined, so we established a large area in the kitchen that could be closed off, where she could be left alone for short periods between visits from the parents.