crater


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Cra·ter

 (krā′tər)
n.
A constellation in the Southern Hemisphere near Hydra and Corvus.

[Latin crātēr, mixing bowl, crater; see crater.]

cra·ter

 (krā′tər)
n.
1. A bowl-shaped depression created by the activity of a volcano or geyser.
2.
a. A bowl-shaped depression in a surface made by an explosion or the impact of a body, such as a meteoroid.
b. A pit; a hollow.
3. Variant of krater.
v. cra·tered, cra·ter·ing, cra·ters
v.tr.
To make craters in: "The missiles did not ... crater the airfield" (Tom Clancy).
v.intr.
1. To form a crater or craters.
2. Slang
a. To fall and crash violently from a great height.
b. To fail utterly: "talked about how tough times were in Texas since the oil business cratered" (Stephen Coonts).

[Latin crātēr, from Greek krātēr, mixing vessel; see kerə- in Indo-European roots.]

crater

(ˈkreɪtə)
n
1. (Geological Science) the bowl-shaped opening at the top or side of a volcano or top of a geyser through which lava and gases are emitted
2. (Physical Geography) a similarly shaped depression formed by the impact of a meteorite or exploding bomb
3. (Astronomy) any of the circular or polygonal walled formations covering the surface of the moon and some other planets, formed probably either by volcanic action or by the impact of meteorites. They can have a diameter of up to 240 kilometres (150 miles) and a depth of 8900 metres (29 000 feet)
4. a pit in an otherwise smooth surface
5. (Archaeology) a large open bowl with two handles, used for mixing wines, esp in ancient Greece
vb
6. (Geological Science) to make or form craters in (a surface, such as the ground)
7. slang to fail; collapse; crash
[C17: from Latin: mixing bowl, crater, from Greek kratēr, from kerannunai to mix]
ˈcratered adj
ˈcraterless adj
ˈcrater-ˌlike adj

Crater

(ˈkreɪtə)
n, Latin genitive Crateris (ˈkreɪtərɪs)
(Astronomy) a small faint constellation in the S hemisphere lying between Virgo and Hydra

cra•ter

(ˈkreɪ tər)

n., v. -tered, -ter•ing. n.
1. the cup-shaped depression or cavity on the surface of the earth or other heavenly body marking the orifice of a volcano.
2. (on the surface of the earth, moon, etc.) a bowl-shaped depression with a raised rim, formed by the impact of a meteoroid.
3. the hole in the ground where a bomb, shell, or military mine has exploded.
4. krater.
v.t.
5. to make a crater or craters in.
v.i.
6. to form a crater or craters.
[1605–15; < Latin < Greek krātḗr mixing bowl, literally, mixer =krā-, base of kerannýnai to mix + -tēr agentive suffix]
cra′ter•like`, adj.

cra·ter

(krā′tər)
1. A bowl-shaped depression at the top of a volcano or at the mouth of a geyser. Volcanic craters can form because of magma explosions, in which a large amount of lava is thrown out from a volcano, leaving a hole, or because the roof of rock over an underground magma pool collapses after the magma has flowed away.
2. A shallow, bowl-shaped hole in a surface, formed by an explosion or by the impact of a body, such as a meteorite.

crater

The pit, depression, or cavity formed in the surface of the Earth by an explosion. It may range from saucer shaped to conical, depending largely on the depth of burst. In the case of a deep underground burst, no rupture of the surface may occur. The resulting cavity is termed a "camouflet."

crater


Past participle: cratered
Gerund: cratering

Imperative
crater
crater
Present
I crater
you crater
he/she/it craters
we crater
you crater
they crater
Preterite
I cratered
you cratered
he/she/it cratered
we cratered
you cratered
they cratered
Present Continuous
I am cratering
you are cratering
he/she/it is cratering
we are cratering
you are cratering
they are cratering
Present Perfect
I have cratered
you have cratered
he/she/it has cratered
we have cratered
you have cratered
they have cratered
Past Continuous
I was cratering
you were cratering
he/she/it was cratering
we were cratering
you were cratering
they were cratering
Past Perfect
I had cratered
you had cratered
he/she/it had cratered
we had cratered
you had cratered
they had cratered
Future
I will crater
you will crater
he/she/it will crater
we will crater
you will crater
they will crater
Future Perfect
I will have cratered
you will have cratered
he/she/it will have cratered
we will have cratered
you will have cratered
they will have cratered
Future Continuous
I will be cratering
you will be cratering
he/she/it will be cratering
we will be cratering
you will be cratering
they will be cratering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been cratering
you have been cratering
he/she/it has been cratering
we have been cratering
you have been cratering
they have been cratering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been cratering
you will have been cratering
he/she/it will have been cratering
we will have been cratering
you will have been cratering
they will have been cratering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been cratering
you had been cratering
he/she/it had been cratering
we had been cratering
you had been cratering
they had been cratering
Conditional
I would crater
you would crater
he/she/it would crater
we would crater
you would crater
they would crater
Past Conditional
I would have cratered
you would have cratered
he/she/it would have cratered
we would have cratered
you would have cratered
they would have cratered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crater - a bowl-shaped geological formation at the top of a volcanocrater - a bowl-shaped geological formation at the top of a volcano
caldera - a large crater caused by the violent explosion of a volcano that collapses into a depression
geological formation, formation - (geology) the geological features of the earth
maar - a flat-bottomed volcanic crater that was formed by an explosion; often filled with water
volcano - a mountain formed by volcanic material
2.Crater - a faint constellation in the southern hemisphere near Hydra and Corvus
3.crater - a bowl-shaped depression formed by the impact of a meteorite or bomb
collector - a crater that has collected cosmic material hitting the earth
lunar crater - a crater on the Earth's Moon
natural depression, depression - a sunken or depressed geological formation

crater

noun hollow, hole, depression, dip, cavity, shell hole A huge crater marks the spot where the explosion happened.
Translations
حُفْره، فَجْوَهفُوَّهـة بُرْكـان
kráter
bombekraterkrater
bombatölcsérkráter
gígursprengjugígur
duobėkrateris
bedrekrāteris
kráter
krater
kraternedslagskratervulkankrater
bomba çukurukrateryanardağ ağzı

crater

[ˈkreɪtəʳ] Ncráter m

crater

[ˈkreɪtər] n (= large hole) → cratère m bomb crater

crater

nKrater m

crater

[ˈkreɪtəʳ] ncratere m

crater

(ˈkreitə) noun
1. the bowl-shaped mouth of a volcano.
2. a hollow made in the ground by a bomb etc.

cra·ter

n. cráter. V.: niche
References in classic literature ?
The whole Group Volcanic -- Numbers of Craters -- Leafless Bushes Colony at Charles Island -- James Island -- Salt-lake in Crater -- Natural History of the Group -- Ornithology, curious Finches -- Reptiles -- Great Tortoises, habits of -- Marine Lizard, feeds on Sea-weed -- Terrestrial Lizard, burrowing habits, herbivorous -- Importance of Reptiles in the Archipelago -- Fish, Shells, Insects -- Botany -- American Type of Organization -- Differences in the Species or Races on different Islands -- Tameness of the Birds -- Fear of Man, an acquired Instinct.
At its bottom there was a shallow lake, in the middle of which a tiny crater formed an islet.
At a sudden turning of the corridor, daylight flooded them and Bukawai stepped out into a small, circular basin in the hill, apparently the crater of an ancient volcano, one of those which never reached the dignity of a mountain and are little more than lava-rimmed pits closed to the earth's surface.
At the high end the skull forms a crater to bed that part of the mass; while under the long floor of this crater -- in another cavity seldom exceeding ten inches in length and as many in depth --reposes the mere handful of this monster's brain.
The crater itself--the ditch--was not so variegated in coloring, but yet, in its softness, richness, and unpretentious elegance, it was more charming, more fascinating to the eye.
In front of her a volcanic crater was pouring forth torrents of melted lava, and hurling masses of rock to an enormous height.
The weird flora and fauna of Caspak were as possible under the thick, warm atmospheric conditions of the super-heated crater as they were in the Mesozoic era under almost exactly similar conditions, which were then probably world-wide.
It is a volcano cone thrust up out of deep sea, with a segment of the crater wall broken out.
1846; The Red Skins, 1846; The Crater (Marks Reef), 1847; Captain Spike, or the Islets of the Gulf, 1848; Jack Tier, or the Florida Reefs, 1848; The Oak Openings, or the Bee-Hunter, 1848; The Sea Lions,
At fifty feet above the peak, in the midst of a rain of stones and scoriae, a large crater was vomiting forth torrents of lava which fell in a cascade of fire into the bosom of the liquid mass.
She appeared completely riddled with craters, and her essentially volcanic character was apparent at each observation.
Stuart observed several very high peaks covered with snow, from two of which smoke ascended in considerable volumes, apparently from craters in a state of eruption.