crayon


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cray·on

 (krā′ŏn′, -ən)
n.
1. A stick of colored wax, charcoal, or chalk, used for drawing.
2. A drawing made with one of these sticks.
tr.v. cray·oned, cray·on·ing, cray·ons
To draw, color, or decorate with a stick of colored wax, charcoal, or chalk.

[French, diminutive of craie, chalk, from Latin crēta.]

cray′on·ist (-ə-nĭst), cray′on·er (-ə-nər) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

crayon

(ˈkreɪən; -ɒn)
n
1. (Art Terms) a small stick or pencil of charcoal, wax, clay, or chalk mixed with coloured pigment
2. (Art Terms) a drawing made with crayons
vb
(Art Terms) to draw or colour with crayons
[C17: from French, from craie, from Latin crēta chalk]
ˈcrayoner, ˈcrayonist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cray•on

(ˈkreɪ ɒn, -ən)

n.
1. a pointed stick or pencil, as of colored chalk or wax, used for drawing or coloring.
2. a drawing in crayons.
v.t.
3. to draw or color with a crayon or crayons.
[1635–45; < French, =craie chalk (< Latin crēta clay, chalk) + -on n. suffix]
cray′on•ist, cray′on•er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

crayon


Past participle: crayoned
Gerund: crayoning

Imperative
crayon
crayon
Present
I crayon
you crayon
he/she/it crayons
we crayon
you crayon
they crayon
Preterite
I crayoned
you crayoned
he/she/it crayoned
we crayoned
you crayoned
they crayoned
Present Continuous
I am crayoning
you are crayoning
he/she/it is crayoning
we are crayoning
you are crayoning
they are crayoning
Present Perfect
I have crayoned
you have crayoned
he/she/it has crayoned
we have crayoned
you have crayoned
they have crayoned
Past Continuous
I was crayoning
you were crayoning
he/she/it was crayoning
we were crayoning
you were crayoning
they were crayoning
Past Perfect
I had crayoned
you had crayoned
he/she/it had crayoned
we had crayoned
you had crayoned
they had crayoned
Future
I will crayon
you will crayon
he/she/it will crayon
we will crayon
you will crayon
they will crayon
Future Perfect
I will have crayoned
you will have crayoned
he/she/it will have crayoned
we will have crayoned
you will have crayoned
they will have crayoned
Future Continuous
I will be crayoning
you will be crayoning
he/she/it will be crayoning
we will be crayoning
you will be crayoning
they will be crayoning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been crayoning
you have been crayoning
he/she/it has been crayoning
we have been crayoning
you have been crayoning
they have been crayoning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been crayoning
you will have been crayoning
he/she/it will have been crayoning
we will have been crayoning
you will have been crayoning
they will have been crayoning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been crayoning
you had been crayoning
he/she/it had been crayoning
we had been crayoning
you had been crayoning
they had been crayoning
Conditional
I would crayon
you would crayon
he/she/it would crayon
we would crayon
you would crayon
they would crayon
Past Conditional
I would have crayoned
you would have crayoned
he/she/it would have crayoned
we would have crayoned
you would have crayoned
they would have crayoned
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crayon - writing implement consisting of a colored stick of composition wax used for writing and drawingcrayon - writing implement consisting of a colored stick of composition wax used for writing and drawing
writing implement - an implement that is used to write
Verb1.crayon - write, draw, or trace with a crayon
draw - represent by making a drawing of, as with a pencil, chalk, etc. on a surface; "She drew an elephant"; "Draw me a horse"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
قَـلَم رَسْـمقَلَم مُلَوَّنيَرسُم بقلم الرَّسـم
pastelkauhelkreslit
farvekridtfarveblyant
väriliitu
kreda u boji
krétával rajzolszínes ceruza
krítarlitur, litblÿanturteikna
クレヨン
크레용
piešti spalvotu pieštuku/spalvota kreidaspalvota kreidaspalvotas pieštukas
krāsains zīmulispasteliszīmēt ar krāsainiem zīmuļiem/pasteļiem
kresliť pastelkoupastelka
barvna kredavoščenka
krita
ดินสอสี
mum boyamum boya ile resim yapmak
bút chì màu

crayon

[ˈkreiən]
A. N (Art) → pastel m, lápiz m de tiza; (child's) → lápiz m de color
B. VTdibujar al pastel
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

crayon

[ˈkreɪən ˈkreɪɒn] ncrayon m de couleur
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

crayon

n
(= pencil)Buntstift m; (= wax crayon)Wachs(mal)stift m; (= chalk crayon)Pastellstift m, → Malkreide f
(= picture)Pastell nt, → Kreide- or Pastellzeichnung f
vti(mit Bunt-/Wachsmal-/Pastellstiften) zeichnen or malen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

crayon

[ˈkreɪən] n (wax) → pastello a cera; (chalk) → gessetto; (coloured pencil) → matita colorata
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

crayon

(ˈkreiən) noun
a coloured pencil or stick of chalk etc for drawing with.
verb
to use crayons to draw a picture etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

crayon

قَلَم مُلَوَّن pastelka farvekridt Wachsmalstift κραγιόνι lápiz de color väriliitu crayon de couleur kreda u boji pastello クレヨン 크레용 kleurpotlood fargestift kredka giz de cera, lápis de cera цветной карандаш krita ดินสอสี mum boya bút chì màu 蜡笔
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
At the back of the estrade, and attached to a moveable partition dividing this schoolroom from another beyond, was a large tableau of wood painted black and varnished; a thick crayon of white chalk lay on my desk for the convenience of elucidating any grammatical or verbal obscurity which might occur in my lessons by writing it upon the tableau; a wet sponge appeared beside the chalk, to enable me to efface the marks when they had served the purpose intended.
Softened into crayon sketches, they did better, for the likenesses were good, and Amy's hair, Jo's nose, Meg's mouth, and Laurie's eyes were pronounced `wonderfully fine'.
A month before, this mountain had been only a name to us, but latterly we had been moving through a steadily thickening double row of pictures of it, done in oil, water, chromo, wood, steel, copper, crayon, and photography, and so it had at length become a shape to us--and a very distinct, decided, and familiar one, too.
Miniatures, halflengths, wholelengths, pencil, crayon, and watercolours had been all tried in turn.
One winter day when a slight fall of snow was feathering the sills and frames of the schoolroom windows, he stood at his black board, crayon in hand, about to commence with a class; when, reading in the countenances of those boys that there was something wrong, and that they seemed in alarm for him, he turned his eyes to the door towards which they faced.
Let us hope it will give way before my mother's custards and this charming Geoffrey Crayon."
Phillips took a chalk crayon and wrote on the blackboard above her head.
But Father Brown still gazed steadily at the red crayon sketch; and Mrs.
Beside this appeared a figure of Columbia, copied from the top of the cigar box that held the crayons.
They had pictures hung on the walls -- mainly Washingtons and Lafayettes, and battles, and High- land Marys, and one called "Signing the Declaration." There was some that they called crayons, which one of the daughters which was dead made her own self when she was only fifteen years old.
I had only time, in dressing, to glance at the solid furniture, the framed pieces of work (done, I supposed, by Steerforth's mother when she was a girl), and some pictures in crayons of ladies with powdered hair and bodices, coming and going on the walls, as the newly-kindled fire crackled and sputtered, when I was called to dinner.
"Dear mama, only think, my cousin cannot put the map of Europe together-- or my cousin cannot tell the principal rivers in Russia-- or, she never heard of Asia Minor--or she does not know the difference between water-colours and crayons!-- How strange!--Did you ever hear anything so stupid?"