creamware


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creamware

(ˈkriːmˌwɛə)
n
(Ceramics) a type of earthenware with a deep cream body developed about 1720 and widely produced. See also Queensware

creamware

High-quality earthenware perfected by Josiah Wedgwood in eighteenth-century Staffordshire, England.
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The town's famous Herculaneum pottery produced a variety of wares including creamware, porcelain and stoneware.
The spout of a creamware coffee pot shaped like the barrel of a musket, dating from 1730-1760 was discovered.
I have a creamware collection in cabinets and antique books that lend some visual interest, but I feel the need for more patterned fabric accents.
Lane Delph was one of the principal areas of the ceramics industry and Bartlam would have been one of a number producing creamware, pearlware and earthenwares.
The same print was transfer-printed onto creamware jugs in Liverpool around the same time, to encourage volunteers to join the civilian militia formed following the Defence of the Realm Act 1803 (fig.2).
Caption: An archival pattern from Wedgwood celebrates the 250th anniversary of creamware in a trend-right palette.
Early successes included the Creamware range, which became so popular that Catherine the Great of Russia ordered a 1,000-piece service.
Wedgwood's creamware, which after receiving a commission from George Ill's consort he was permitted to name Queen's Ware, was relatively easy and inexpensive to produce, offering fine china to the mass market.
Dentre os fragmentos, deve-se ressaltar que 3 sao de urinois (penicos) em creamware.
Encouraged by entrepreneurs eager to sell them the trappings of respectable existence, Americans installed parlors in simple houses, purchased carpets for the floors, drank tea from inexpensive creamware, planted shrubs and grass in front yards where there had been weeds and packed earth, and bought books instructing them in comportment and etiquette.
This was followed by the creamware Frog Service (1773), comprising 952 pieces and ordered for the Empress's country retreat La Grenouillere ('The Frogmarsh').
THE Bidston jug (priced at pounds 1,575) and the other pieces of creamware illustrated will be exhibited on Roger de Ville's stand at Chester Antiques Show from February 9-12.