credit card

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credit card

n.
A plastic card having a magnetic strip, issued by a bank or business authorizing the holder to buy goods or services on credit. Also called charge card.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

credit card

n
(Banking & Finance) a card issued by banks, businesses, etc, enabling the holder to obtain goods and services on credit
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cred′it card`


n.
a card that entitles a person to make purchases on credit.
[1885–90, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.credit card - a card (usually plastic) that assures a seller that the person using it has a satisfactory credit rating and that the issuer will see to it that the seller receives payment for the merchandise deliveredcredit card - a card (usually plastic) that assures a seller that the person using it has a satisfactory credit rating and that the issuer will see to it that the seller receives payment for the merchandise delivered; "do you take plastic?"
magnetic stripe - a short strip of magnetic tape attached to a credit card or debit card; it contains data that will tell a reading device who you are and what your account number is, etc.
positive identification - evidence proving that you are who you say you are; evidence establishing that you are among the group of people already known to the system; recognition by the system leads to acceptance; "a system for positive identification can prevent the use of a single identity by several people"
charge account credit, open-end credit, revolving credit - a consumer credit line that can be used up to a certain limit or paid down at any time
bank card - a credit card issued by a bank
calling card, phone card - a card that is used instead of cash to make telephone calls
cash card, cashcard - a credit card that entitles the holder to receive cash
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بِطاقَة اعتِمادكارت اِئْتِمَان
kreditní karta
kreditkort
luottokortti
kreditna kartica
krítarkort
クレジットカード
신용카드
úverová karta
posojilna kartica
kreditkort
บัตรเครดิต
thẻ tín dụng

credit card

ncarta di credito
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

credit

(ˈkredit) noun
1. time allowed for payment of goods etc after they have been received. We don't give credit at this shop.
2. money loaned (by a bank).
3. trustworthiness regarding ability to pay for goods etc. Your credit is good.
4. (an entry on) the side of an account on which payments received are entered. Our credits are greater than our debits.
5. the sum of money which someone has in an account at a bank. Your credit amounts to 2,014 dollars.
6. belief or trust. This theory is gaining credit.
7. (American) a certificate to show that a student has completed a course which counts towards his degree.
verb
1. to enter (a sum of money) on the credit side (of an account). This cheque was credited to your account last month.
2. (with with) to think of (a person or thing) as having. He was credited with magical powers.
3. to believe (something) to be possible. Well, would you credit that!
ˈcreditable adjective
bringing honour or respect. creditable effort.
ˈcreditably adverb
ˈcreditor noun
a person to whom a debt is owed.
ˈcredits noun plural
the list of names of the actors, producer, director etc given at the beginning or end of a film.
credit card
a card which allows the holder to buy goods etc on credit. to pay by credit card.
be a credit to (someone), do (someone) credit
to bring honour or respect to (someone or something). Your son is a credit to his school; Your honesty does you credit.
give (someone) credit (for something)
to acknowledge and praise (someone for a good piece of work etc). He was given credit for completing the work so quickly.
on credit
payment being made after the date of sale. Do you sell goods on credit?
take (the) credit (for something)
to accept the praise given (for something). I did all the work, and he took all the credit.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

credit card

كارت اِئْتِمَان kreditní karta kreditkort Kreditkarte πιστωτική κάρτα tarjeta de crédito luottokortti carte de crédit kreditna kartica carta di credito クレジットカード 신용카드 creditcard kredittkort karta kredytowa cartão de crédito кредитная карточка kreditkort บัตรเครดิต kredi kartı thẻ tín dụng 信用卡
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
The credit-card frauds obtain your crucial personal information like social security number or credit card data to open accounts or take loans in your own name, thus hurting you financially.
Growing credit-card use in China could have repercussions for the broader global economy.
This warning is underscored by the new Pew study which analyzed business credit card application disclosures and household direct mail data from the nation's 12 largest credit-card issuers, which control approximately 85 percent of the small-business credit-card market.
Then, the money holdings of a credit-card bank is analyzed.
Always leave home without it: A further investigation of the credit-card effect on willingness to pay.
Also they reported that higher credit-card limits do not necessarily lead to higher credit-card debt.
18, 2009 (CENS) -- Due to aggressive promotions, most of Taiwan's credit-card issuers witnessed growths in credit-card spending in June, with Citibank Taiwan posting the highest average per credit-card spending of NT$9,231 (US$279.73 at US$1 = NT$33), up 22% from NT$7,576 (US$229.58) recorded two months ago in April.
Shred pre-approved credit card and mortgage offers that come in the mail, as well as credit-card receipts and canceled checks you no longer need.
In addition, credit-card companies and other credit lenders--banks, oil companies, and department stores, among others--rarely exercise significant oversight before signing up new customers.
"Consumer Behavior and the Stickiness of Credit-Card Interest Rates," American Economic Review, vol.
Some experts say part of what's fueling the bankruptcy boom is more aggressive marketing to young people by credit-card companies.
"This is about reflective giving, rather than reflexive giving," said Andrew Goldberger, the co-founder of ParishPay, a New York-based company that has established an electronic credit-card payment system now being used by churches in New York, Illinois and California.