credulously


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Related to credulously: incredulously

cred·u·lous

 (krĕj′ə-ləs)
adj.
1. Disposed to believe too readily; gullible.
2. Arising from or characterized by credulity. See Usage Note at credible.

[From Latin crēdulus, from crēdere, to believe; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]

cred′u·lous·ly adv.
cred′u·lous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.credulously - in a credulous mannercredulously - in a credulous manner; "the children followed the teacher credulously"
disbelievingly, incredulously, unbelievingly - in an incredulous manner; "the woman looked up at her incredulously"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

credulously

[ˈkredjʊləslɪ] ADVcon credulidad
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

credulously

[ˈkrɛdjʊləslɪ] advcon credulità
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
But Milliken, captain of detectives, was too well known to her, and she yielded to the law of which he was the symbol and of which she was credulously ignorant.
Before we can do anything, we--especially cannabis advocates and those in the elite media who for too long credulously have accepted their claims--need to come to terms with the truth about the science on marijuana.
"(Trump) will routinely say things that aren't even close to being true, and if you credulously repeat them--even in tweets--without saying they are false, you are arguably part of the problem," said Mathew Ingram of the Columbia Journalism Review.
On Thursday, in a Twitter post that went on (of course) to attack former FBI Director James B Comey and Hillary Clinton, Trump reiterated credulously:"Russia continues to say they had nothing to do with Meddling in our Election!" Some might argue that Trump's comments about NATO, which arguably reflect his"America First" approach to foreign affairs, as well as his see-no-evil attitude toward Russia's election meddling, don't matter because the rest of the US government pursues a policy toward Russia that is rooted in reality.
397, 398-99 (1987) ("The purported 'public interest' justifications so credulously reported by Justice Stone were patently bogus.").
Some of the game's sillier critics credulously repeated claims that D&D books emitted screams when thrown in fireplaces.
He did not identify with a king hidden in a cave in whom the masses are supposed to have credulously believed.
Only the most credulously stubborn, or stubbornly credulous, of readers could come away from Hillary Rodham Clinton's loser'slounge testament believing her to be the malevolent dark angel of Far Right and extreme-Left fantasies.
The rhetorical layer may be absent in some contexts, for example, when neutrally building arguments from a knowledge base, but can permeate all the other layers in other contexts since goal-oriented considerations may drive the decisions of which arguments to build, taking into account their relations with other arguments, of whether, how, and when to use the arguments in a dialogue, and of which assessment method (for example, whether a more skeptically or more credulously oriented one) to apply.
But Trump and his circle are far from bright or the best at anything other than bamboozling those who credulously place faith in them.
At every level, we were taken aback by students' lack of preparation: middle school students unable to tell the difference between an advertisement and a news story; high school students taking at face value a cooked-up chart from the Minnesota Gun Owners Political Action Committee; college students credulously accepting a .org top-level domain name as if it were a Good Housekeeping seal.
But Armstrong treats it credulously, implying that Grant's snubbing of Kelly was malicious, and that it provoked, or exacerbated, Kelly's mood swings and alcoholism.