credulousness


Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to credulousness: ridiculousness

cred·u·lous

 (krĕj′ə-ləs)
adj.
1. Disposed to believe too readily; gullible.
2. Arising from or characterized by credulity. See Usage Note at credible.

[From Latin crēdulus, from crēdere, to believe; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]

cred′u·lous·ly adv.
cred′u·lous·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.credulousness - tendency to believe too readily and therefore to be easily deceived
naiveness, naivete, naivety - lack of sophistication or worldliness
Translations
důvěřivost
godtroenhednaivitet
trúgirni
dôverčivosť
çabucak inanmasafdillik

credulous

(ˈkredjuləs) , ((American) -dʒu-) adjective
believing too easily.
ˈcredulousness, creˈdulity (-ˈdjuː-) noun
References in classic literature ?
Antonia had the most trusting, responsive eyes in the world; love and credulousness seemed to look out of them with open faces.
However, the main obstructions that have made the big chunk of the population to suffer are misinformation, misconception, credulousness and petty-mindedness of some people.
Finally, the Garcetti Court's rosy depiction of available statutory protections both reflects and helps to justify the Court's credulousness that the political branches will protect work product speech adequately.
Our results, supported across multiple model specifications, do not seem to be driven by brokers' market power or investors' credulousness, and are larger (in economic terms) for markets where information asymmetry is a greater concern.
The credulousness of all too many journalists about the supposed misconduct revealed by 'Climategate,' a pseudo-scandal that relied on selective, out-of-context quotes from e-mails at a British university, prefigured the disastrous media handling of hacked Democratic e-mails in 2016.
People still believe that they can get rich quickly and fraudsters play on this credulousness, he added.
Apart from Castabella's poignant appeal to a helpless heaven, belief only appears as callow credulousness and cant.
While gossip insists upon its own truthfulness, and demands credulousness of its audience, it cannot ultimately deliver the "real" or "true" insights that it promises.
They also expressed hope and credulousness that the station would be approved "any week now" (Fieldnotes, January 9, 2007).
James Lawrence Fly understood that such credulousness ultimately hurts the citizenry.
There's little to her beyond her wide eyes, her credulousness and various scenes of sexual exploitation and conquest.
Throughout the mid-late Victorian era, for example, the English-speaking world was captivated by Asian mysticism and magic tricks which called up "a thousand thoughts and fancies associated with all that is weird and mysterious." (28) Among those happy to exploit the credulousness of Western audiences, by claiming special insights into arcane "Eastern" knowledge, was a British illusionist named Isaiah Hughes.