creed


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creed

 (krēd)
n.
1. A formal statement of religious belief; a confession of faith.
2. A system of belief, principles, or opinions: laws banning discrimination on the basis of race or creed; an architectural creed that demanded simple lines.

[Middle English crede, from Old English crēda, from Latin crēdō, I believe; see credo.]

creed

(kriːd)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a concise, formal statement of the essential articles of Christian belief, such as the Apostles' Creed or the Nicene Creed
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) any statement or system of beliefs or principles
[Old English crēda, from Latin crēdo I believe]
ˈcreedal, ˈcredal adj

Creed

(kriːd)
n
(Biography) Frederick. 1871–1957, Canadian inventor, resident in Scotland from 1897, noted for his invention of the teleprinter, first used in 1912

creed

(krid)

n.
1. an authoritative formulated statement of the chief articles of Christian belief.
2. an accepted system of religious or other belief.
[before 1000; Middle English crede, Old English crēda < Latin crēdō I believe; see credo]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.creed - any system of principles or beliefscreed - any system of principles or beliefs
testament - a profession of belief; "he stated his political testament"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Athanasian Creed - a Christian profession of faith
2.creed - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that groupcreed - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that group
original sin - a sin said to be inherited by all descendants of Adam; "Adam and Eve committed the original sin when they ate the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
confession - the document that spells out the belief system of a given church (especially the Reformation churches of the 16th century)
ahimsa - a Buddhist and Hindu and especially Jainist doctrine holding that all forms of life are sacred and urging the avoidance of violence
dogma, tenet - a religious doctrine that is proclaimed as true without proof
ecumenicalism, ecumenicism, ecumenism - (Christianity) the doctrine of the ecumenical movement that promotes cooperation and better understanding among different religious denominations: aimed at universal Christian unity
Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary, Immaculate Conception - (Christianity) the Roman Catholic dogma that God preserved the Virgin Mary from any stain of original sin from the moment she was conceived
Incarnation - (Christianity) the Christian doctrine of the union of God and man in the person of Jesus Christ
Nicene Creed - (Christianity) a formal creed summarizing Christian beliefs; first adopted in 325 and later expanded
real presence - (Christianity) the Christian doctrine that the body of Christ is actually present in the Eucharist

creed

noun belief, principles, profession (of faith), doctrine, canon, persuasion, dogma, tenet, credo, catechism, articles of faith The centre is open to all, no matter what race or creed.

creed

noun
A system of religious belief:
Translations
عَقيدَه، مَذْهَب
krédovíravyznánívyznání víry
livsopfattelseoverbevisningtro
oppiusko
crédofoicredo
apostoli hitvalláshitvallás
trúarjátning
pažiūros
kredopārliecībaticība
vyznanie viery
dinsel inançlaritikat

creed

[kriːd] N (= religion) → credo m, religión f; (= system of beliefs) → credo m
the Creed (Rel) → el Credo

Creed

[ˈkriːd] n
the Creed (in Mass)le Credo

creed

[ˈkriːd] n
(= religious belief) → croyance f
(= principles) → philosophie f

creed

n (Eccl: = prayer) → Glaubensbekenntnis nt; (as part of service, fig also) → Kredo nt, → Credo nt

creed

[kriːd] ncredo, dottrina

creed

(kriːd) noun
(a short statement of) one's (especially religious) beliefs.
References in classic literature ?
Nor seems it strange indeed To hold the happy creed That all fair things that bloom and die Have conscious life as well as I.
No; I cannot believe that: I hold another creed: which no one ever taught me, and which I seldom mention; but in which I delight, and to which I cling: for it extends hope to all: it makes Eternity a rest--a mighty home, not a terror and an abyss.
I am sure, from the tenor of books I have read, that many who have visited this land in years gone by, were Presbyterians, and came seeking evidences in support of their particular creed; they found a Presbyterian Palestine, and they had already made up their minds to find no other, though possibly they did not know it, being blinded by their zeal.
the Catholic creed, and not as rendered here "fidelity" and "faithful." Observe that the word "religione" was suffered to stand in the text of the Testina, being used to signify indifferently every shade of belief, as witness "the religion," a phrase inevitably employed to designate the Huguenot heresy.
However imperfectly those disturbances are set forth in the following pages, they are impartially painted by one who has no sympathy with the Romish Church, though he acknowledges, as most men do, some esteemed friends among the followers of its creed.
His creed of determinism was such that it almost amounted to a vice, and quite amounted, on its negative side, to a renunciative philosophy which had cousinship with that of Schopenhauer and Leopardi.
"It is the duty of a high priestess to instruct, to interpret--according to the creed that others, wiser than herself, have laid down; but there is nothing in the creed which says that she must believe.
"If we take you with us," he said, in solemn words, "it can only be as believers in our own creed. We shall have no wolves in our fold.
If we embrace the tenets of those who oppose the adoption of the proposed Constitution, as the standard of our political creed, we cannot fail to verify the gloomy doctrines which predict the impracticability of a national system pervading entire limits of the present Confederacy.
There is no other example, no other ideal, and the chief use of Tolstoy is to enforce this fact in our age, after nineteen centuries of hopeless endeavor to substitute ceremony for character, and the creed for the life.
Observing these people narrowly, even when the iron hand of misfortune has shaken them from their unquestioning hold on the world, one sees little trace of religion, still less of a distinctively Christian creed. Their belief in the Unseen, so far as it manifests itself at all, seems to be rather a pagan kind; their moral notions, though held with strong tenacity, seem to have no standard beyond hereditary custom.
Excess of feeling--excess of feeling; and it was part of his creed that any excess of feeling was unhealthy--morally unprofitable; a taint on practical manhood.