creeper

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creep·er

(krē′pər)
n.
1. One that moves or progresses by creeping.
2. Botany A plant that spreads by means of stems that creep.
3. See cradle.
4. A grappling device for dragging bodies of water, such as lakes or rivers.
5. A one-piece fitted garment for an infant.
6. creepers A metal frame with a spike or spikes, attached to a shoe or boot to prevent slipping, especially on ice.
7. Slang A person who is a creep, especially one who is considered to be unsettling.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

creeper

(ˈkriːpə)
n
1. a person or animal that creeps
2. (Botany) a plant, such as the ivy or periwinkle, that grows by creeping
3. (Animals) Also called: tree creeper US and Canadian any small songbird of the family Certhiidae of the N hemisphere, having a brown-and-white plumage and slender downward-curving bill. They creep up trees to feed on insects
4. (Mechanical Engineering) a hooked instrument for dragging deep water
5. (Automotive Engineering) Also called: cradle a flat board or framework mounted on casters, used to lie on when working under cars
6. (Cricket) cricket Also called: daisy cutter a bowled ball that keeps low or travels along the ground
7. (Furniture) either of a pair of low iron supports for logs in a hearth
8. (Clothing & Fashion) informal a shoe with a soft sole
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

creep•er

(ˈkri pər)

n.
1. a person or thing that creeps.
2. a plant that grows upon or just beneath the surface of the ground, sending out rootlets from the stem, as ivy.
3. a spiked iron plate worn on the shoe to prevent slipping on ice, rock, etc.
4. any of various songbirds that ascend the trunks and larger limbs of trees.
5. a grappling device for dragging a body of water.
[before 1000]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.creeper - any plant (as ivy or periwinkle) that grows by creepingcreeper - any plant (as ivy or periwinkle) that grows by creeping
tracheophyte, vascular plant - green plant having a vascular system: ferns, gymnosperms, angiosperms
2.creeper - a person who crawls or creeps along the ground
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
3.creeper - any of various small insectivorous birds of the northern hemisphere that climb up a tree trunk supporting themselves on stiff tail feathers and their feetcreeper - any of various small insectivorous birds of the northern hemisphere that climb up a tree trunk supporting themselves on stiff tail feathers and their feet
oscine, oscine bird - passerine bird having specialized vocal apparatus
American creeper, brown creeper, Certhia americana - a common creeper in North America with a down-curved bill
Certhia familiaris, European creeper - common European brown-and-buff tree creeper with down-curved bill
Tichodroma muriaria, tichodrome, wall creeper - crimson-and-grey songbird that inhabits town walls and mountain cliffs of southern Eurasia and northern Africa
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

creeper

noun climbing plant, runner, vine (chiefly U.S.), climber, rambler, trailing plant flaming curtains of Virginia creeper
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
نَبات مُتَسَلِّـق
popínavá rostlina
slyngplante
kotróhorgonykúszónövény
skriîjurt
tırmanıcı bitki

creeper

[ˈkriːpəʳ] N
1. (Bot) → enredadera f
2. creepers (US) (= rompers) (for baby) → pelele m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

creeper

[ˈkriːpər] nplante f grimpante
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

creeper

n
(= plant, along ground) → Kriechpflanze f; (upwards) → Kletterpflanze f
(= bird)Baumläufer m
creepers pl (US) Schuhe mit dicken Gummisohlen, → Leisetreter pl (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

creeper

[ˈkriːpəʳ] n (Bot) → rampicante m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

creep2

(kriːp) noun
(slang) a disgusting person. Leave her alone, you creep.
ˈcreeper noun
a creeping plant.
ˈcreepy adjective
causing feelings of fear etc. The house is rather creepy at night.
ˈcreepily adverb
ˈcreepiness noun
ˌcreepy-ˈcrawlyplural ˌcreepy-ˈcrawlies noun
a small creeping insect.
creep up on
to approach slowly and stealthily. Old age creeps up on us all.
make someone's flesh creep
to scare or horrify someone.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The summer-house was choked up by creeping plants; and the appearance of the creepers was followed by the appearance of the birds of night.
The green growths in the sides of the ravines burned up to broken wires and curled films of dead stuff; the hidden pools sank down and caked over, keeping the last least footmark on their edges as if it had been cast in iron; the juicy-stemmed creepers fell away from the trees they clung to and died at their feet; the bamboos withered, clanking when the hot winds blew, and the moss peeled off the rocks deep in the Jungle, till they were as bare and as hot as the quivering blue boulders in the bed of the stream.
Huge creepers depended in great loops from tree to tree, dense under-brush overgrew a tangled mass of fallen trunks and branches.
The game trail down which he walked had become by ages of use a deep, narrow trench, its walls topped on either side by impenetrable thicket and dense-growing trees closely interwoven with thick-stemmed creepers and lesser vines inextricably matted into two solid ramparts of vegetation.
As the green vines and creepers closed after him, and the explorers were left alone with their possessions piled around them, Ned remarked:
They had strayed a long way off the path, and the jungle was so thick with bushes and creepers and vines that sometimes they could hardly move at all, and the Doctor had to take out his pocket-knife and cut his way along.
On the farther side I saw through a bluish haze a tangle of trees and creepers, and above these again the luminous blue of the sky.
The wall between the pillars was entirely covered, to the height of six or seven feet, with creepers, from which hung quantities of ripe fruit and of brilliant flowers, that almost hid the leaves.
As Tarzan leaped for the vines he realized that the lion was close upon him and that his life depended upon the strength of the creepers clinging to the city walls; but to his intense relief he found the stems as large around as a man's arm, and the tendrils which had fastened themselves to the wall so firmly fixed, that his weight upon the stem appeared to have no appreciable effect upon them.
The myriad birds in their brilliant plumage--the gorgeous tropical blooms upon the festooned creepers falling in great loops from the giant trees.
As she did so, there was a sudden rush of a great body behind her, a menacing roar that caused the earth to tremble, and something crashed into the very creepers to which she was clinging--but below her.
The creepers, catching against his legs, cried out harshly as their sprays were torn from the barks of trees.