crenel

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Related to crenelles: battlement, merlons

cren·el

 (krĕn′əl)
n.
1. An open space or notch between two merlons in a battlement or crenelated wall.
2. A crenature.

[Middle English, from Old French; see crenelated.]

crenel

(ˈkrɛnəl) or

crenelle

n
1. (Architecture) any of a set of openings formed in the top of a wall or parapet and having slanting sides, as in a battlement
2. (Biology) another name for crenation
[C15: from Old French, literally: a little notch, from cren notch, from Late Latin crēna]

cren•el

(ˈkrɛn l)

also cre•nelle

(krɪˈnɛl)
n.
any of the open spaces between the merlons of a battlement.
[1475–85; < Middle French, Old French, appar. diminutive of Middle French cren notch, Old French cran; compare crenate, cranny]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crenel - one of a series of rounded projections (or the notches between them) formed by curves along an edge (as the edge of a leaf or piece of cloth or the margin of a shell or a shriveled red blood cell observed in a hypertonic solution etc.)crenel - one of a series of rounded projections (or the notches between them) formed by curves along an edge (as the edge of a leaf or piece of cloth or the margin of a shell or a shriveled red blood cell observed in a hypertonic solution etc.)
curve, curved shape - the trace of a point whose direction of motion changes
2.crenel - a notch or open space between two merlons in a crenelated battlement
battlement, crenelation, crenellation - a rampart built around the top of a castle with regular gaps for firing arrows or guns
space - an empty area (usually bounded in some way between things); "the architect left space in front of the building"; "they stopped at an open space in the jungle"; "the space between his teeth"
Verb1.crenel - supply with battlements
architecture - the profession of designing buildings and environments with consideration for their esthetic effect
furnish, provide, supply, render - give something useful or necessary to; "We provided the room with an electrical heater"
References in periodicals archive ?
Haddox begins with a consideration of the church and racial mixing as they are exemplified in Les Crenelles (The Holly Berries), a collection of lyric poems written in French and published by free Creoles of color in New Orleans.
Haddox is shrewd to begin with Les Crenelles, for, as he points out, the connection between the church and miscegenation would continue to circulate well into the twentieth century.
Alice Dunbar-Nelson, sharing the mixed-race ancestry of the gens de couleur libres, reaffirms the Les Crenelles poets' connection of the church and mixed-race individuals, but she critiques it.