creolism

creolism

the state of being a creole.
See also: Race
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(17) While the sumptuary and hybrid aspects of festivals during the Habsburg period revealed a policy of promoting adherence to the Habsburg dynasty and its ideology based on the instances of viceroyal power, that changed in the 17th century due to the incipient emergence of Creolism. In the 18th century, this became open differentiation between an American and a peninsular identity, which would be transformed in the 19th century into nationalism and pro-autonomy and independence movements.
Creolism as a product of the combination of Europeans, Africans, and Native Indians was completely transformed in the later part of the century because those who were in charge of the nation were more eager to resemble the Europeans than to preserve the unique traits of the culture that they had gained through the mixture of the mentioned three races.
In addition to highlighting, again, the inherent creolism within African American literary traditions, the juxtaposition of the novel and the opera reveals that opera and operatic aesthetics might have played a more significant role within the development of African American literary traditions than previously considered.
Its presentation of the history of literary and cultural criticisms of Creolism, as well as the terminological and bibliographic notes, will be especially useful for scholars interested in pursuing further study.
Creolism as a product of the combination of Europeans, Africans and Native Indians was completely transformed in the later part of the century because those who were in charge of the nation were more eager to resemble the Europeans than to preserve the unique trait of culture they have gained through the mixture of the mentioned three races.
His claim that 63% of his black parishioners--both adults and children--could recite the principles of the faith might reflect a high level of creolism (though he also noted that about half of the children die before they reach the age of twelve).
Terms such as hybridity, Creolism, Beur culture, and francophone, as well as the emergence of the postcolonial texts and studies which are now the object of critical discourse - these bear testament to the need for a reformulation of our position in space.
There have been a number of occasions in the history of the United States when a kind of pluralism or, if you want, a kind of mestizaje, metissage, or creolism, was quite feasible.
His work has become more, rather than less, financially interesting now that its obsessions with colonialism, creolism, and history can be plugged into the market's three-year-old concern with multiculturalism.
Briquette is certainly the best of Tusa's restaurants, with a handsome dining room and an interesting menu of hip Creolisms. Its chef spent a few years working with the late Gerard Crozier, who was one of the best French chefs in the history of New Orleans dining.<br />WHY IT'S GOOD<br />The impressive side of Briquette is that on any given night they'll have a half dozen or more whole finfish available.
Linguistic features investigated include future markers in Sranan, relative clauses in Standard Jamaican English, negation in Bequia, various morpho-syntactic features representing Jamaican creolisms, the Tobagonian repertoire, and Eastern Maroon lectal variation in French Guiana.