creolization


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creolization

(ˌkriːəʊlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

creolisation

n
1. (Linguistics) linguistics (of a pidgin language) the process of becoming a creole
2. (Sociology) sociol the process of assimilation in which neighbouring cultures share certain features to form a new distinct culture
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, his detailed engagement with the concept of creolization offers helpful insights to a term fraught with ambiguity and subject to diverse interpretations.
They cover rootedness and the new cosmopolitanism: sovereignty, hosts, guests, and hospitality; minority bodies; minoritarian mobilities; spaces and vectors: migration, hybridity, creolization; and the powers and perils of cultural expression.
Chude-Sokei's cross-cultural analysis thus includes creolization, creolite, and dub music as well as cyborg theory, cyberpunk, and Afrofuturism.
of creolization and indigeneity that have shaped the world" (WLT,
But she pursues many avenues along the way, tracing the route of creolization and "inventions," telling an "object history" of the Virgin's celebrated effigies, and, finally, detailing the way Cubans have deployed the Virgin in the streets to press claims about their collective identities.
The final section of the book, "To Reinvent Life," defines and surveys the terms "creolization" and "diaspora" as they relate to New Orleans.
Francophone, Anglophone, Dutch and Spanish creolization in the Caribbean is examined to reveal reconfigured national and regional identities.
The fundamental call for conversation is a call for the study of regions of the world not to seek to apply frameworks of understanding to the Caribbean in Orientalist careerist mode--whether these are theoretical frameworks generated elsewhere and applied to the region (Robinson, 2003), or theoretical frameworks supposedly extracted from the region and re-routed elsewhere (such as creolization; see for example Stewart, 2007).
She brings together the Creolistes of the Francophone Caribbean, Confiant, Bernabe, and Chamoiseau, with Glissant, Mikhail Bahktin, Lefebvre, and Francois Rabelais to explain how the recognition and practice of creolization in language, architecture, and literature challenge Western colonial ideologies that refuse Caribbean reality and continue to alienate the region from itself.