creosote bush

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Related to creosote bushes: Larrea tridentata

creosote bush

n.
A resinous evergreen shrub (Larrea tridentata), having yellow flowers and aromatic foliage, native to the deserts of the southwest United States and Mexico.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

creosote bush

n
(Plants) a shrub, Larrea (or Covillea) tridentata of the western US and Mexico, that has resinous leaves with an odour resembling creosote, and can live for many thousands of years: family Zygophyllaceae. Also called: greasewood
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cre′osote bush`


n.
a shrub, Larreatridentata, of the caltrop family, native to arid regions of the southwestern U.S. and Mexico, having yellow flowers and resinous foliage.
[1840–50, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.creosote bush - desert shrub of southwestern United States and New Mexico having persistent resinous aromatic foliage and small yellow flowerscreosote bush - desert shrub of southwestern United States and New Mexico having persistent resinous aromatic foliage and small yellow flowers
genus Larrea, Larrea - xerophytic evergreen shrubs; South America to southwestern United States
Sonora gum - acidulous gum resin of the creosote bush
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
While not all animal diets are as toxic as those of woodrats and other rodents that eat plants like creosote bushes or juniper, most mammals have some toxins in their diet.
Creosote bushes were common in the study area and provided visual cover, reducing the likelihood that cameras would be noticed by potential scavengers or people.
The air, in contrast with Phoenix's smog, is crisp and smells lightly of creosote bushes -- their resinous aroma becomes pungent during infrequent desert rains and was used by Native Americans to relieve congestion.