crescive

crescive

(ˈkrɛsɪv)
adj
increasing; growing
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
The great and crescive self, rooted in absolute nature, supplants all relative existence and ruins the kingdom of mortal friendship and love.
cervices crescive crevices cracks that increase/expand
Henry's previous dilation--his rapid growth, his "crescive ...
While Ely's comment that the King is "crescive in his faculty" admits, slyly, that growth is a more natural explanation than miraculousness, it is the latter that carries the greater weight.
The centre is managed by Crescive Corporation, a philanthropic organization created by the Keewatin-Patricia board with the aim of growing community assets and having a place for adult education.
Latour's new enlightenment touches also on Emerson's notions of the "great and crescive self" and every person's "constitutional necessity of seeing things under private aspects" ("Experience" 305, 308).
A learning milieu promoting student empowerment by acknowledgment of crescive competency is likely to lead to greater retention of the material (13).
Beamish calls this accident an example of what he calls crescive troubles, which are ecological events that occur over time.
"These systems are human constructions, whether designed by engineers and corporate presidents or the result of unplanned, unwitting, crescive, slowly evolving human attempts to cope.
The impossible distance between the divine self and the world carried over to human relations: "The great and crescive self, rooted in absolute nature, supplants all relative existence, and ruins the kingdom of mortal friendship and love." (18) If I am divine, and you a figment, what proportion can there be between us?
The great and crescive self, rooted in absolute nature, supplants all relative existence and ruins the kingdom of mortal friendship and love.
With Warner Gettys, Dawson produced a widely-used textbook, An Introduction to Sociology (1929), which classified the family as a "crescive institution." As such, its form and function correspond to historic conditions, so that "any fundamental changes going on in the latter are reflected in the family units." Also like their Chicago mentors, Dawson and Gettys inventoried modernization's harmful effects, yet concluded optimistically that the family was exhibiting "remarkable tenacity," holding its own by means of "modifications and readjustments to a changing social order."(13)