cretonne

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cre·tonne

 (krĭ-tŏn′, krē′tŏn′)
n.
A heavy unglazed cotton, linen, or rayon fabric, colorfully printed and used for draperies and slipcovers.

[After Creton, a village of northwest France.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cretonne

(krɛˈtɒn; ˈkrɛtɒn)
n
(Textiles)
a. a heavy cotton or linen fabric with a printed design, used for furnishing
b. (as modifier): cretonne chair covers.
[C19: from French, from Creton Norman village where it originated]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cre•tonne

(krɪˈtɒn, ˈkri tɒn)

n.
a heavy, brightly printed cotton or linen fabric used esp. for drapery and slipcovers.
[1865–70; < French, after Creton, Norman village where it was produced]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cretonne - an unglazed heavy fabric; brightly printed; used for slipcovers and draperies
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

cretonne

[kreˈtɒn] Ncretona f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cretonne

nCretonne f or m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Gone were the Morris papers and gone the severe cretonnes, gone were the Arundel prints that had adorned the walls of her drawingroom in Ashley Gardens; the room blazed with fantastic colour, and I wondered if she knew that those varied hues, which fashion had imposed upon her, were due to the dreams of a poor painter in a South Sea island.
Some were draping chintzes and cretonnes, and others, his neighbour told him were preparing country orders that had come in by post.
She spent some of her week's pay in the purchase of flowered cretonne for a lambrequin.