crevice


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Related to crevice: Crevice corrosion

crev·ice

 (krĕv′ĭs)
n.
A narrow crack or opening; a fissure or cleft.

[Middle English, from Old French crevace, probably from Vulgar Latin *crepācia, from *crepa, from Latin crepāre, to crack.]

crev′iced adj.

crevice

(ˈkrɛvɪs)
n
(Physical Geography) a narrow fissure or crack; split; cleft
[C14: from Old French crevace, from crever to burst, from Latin crepāre to crack]

crev•ice

(ˈkrɛv ɪs)

n.
a crack forming an opening; cleft; rift; fissure.
[1300–50; Middle English crevace < Anglo-French, Old French, =crev(er) to crack (< Latin crepāre) + -ace n. suffix]
crev′iced, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crevice - a long narrow depression in a surfacecrevice - a long narrow depression in a surface
imprint, impression, depression - a concavity in a surface produced by pressing; "he left the impression of his fingers in the soft mud"
2.crevice - a long narrow openingcrevice - a long narrow opening    
chap - a crack in a lip caused usually by cold
chink - a narrow opening as e.g. between planks in a wall
crevasse - a deep fissure
fatigue crack - a crack in metal resulting from metal fatigue
faulting, geological fault, fracture, break, fault, shift - (geology) a crack in the earth's crust resulting from the displacement of one side with respect to the other; "they built it right over a geological fault"; "he studied the faulting of the earth's crust"
opening, gap - an open or empty space in or between things; "there was a small opening between the trees"; "the explosion made a gap in the wall"
rift - a narrow fissure in rock
slit - a narrow fissure
split - a lengthwise crack in wood; "he inserted the wedge into a split in the log"
volcano, vent - a fissure in the earth's crust (or in the surface of some other planet) through which molten lava and gases erupt

crevice

noun gap, opening, hole, split, crack, rent, fracture, rift, slit, cleft, chink, fissure, cranny, interstice a huge boulder with rare ferns growing in every crevice

crevice

noun
A usually narrow partial opening caused by splitting and rupture:
Translations
شِق، صَدْع، تَجْويف
štěrbina
klippespaltesprække
sprunga
siauras plyšyssprogymė
aizaplaisa

crevice

[ˈkrevɪs] Ngrieta f, hendedura f

crevice

[ˈkrɛvɪs] n [rock] → fissure f

crevice

nSpalte f

crevice

[ˈkrɛvɪs] ncrepa, fessura

crevice

(ˈkrevis) noun
a crack or narrow opening (in a wall, rock etc). Plants grew in the crevices.
References in classic literature ?
In 1864 a party of tourists was descending Mont Blanc, and while picking their way over one of the mighty glaciers of that lofty region, roped together, as was proper, a young porter disengaged himself from the line and started across an ice-bridge which spanned a crevice.
Outside the balustrade of the tower, directly under the point where the priest had paused, there was one of those fantastically carved stone gutters with which Gothic edifices bristle, and, in a crevice of that gutter, two pretty wallflowers in blossom, shaken out and vivified, as it were, by the breath of air, made frolicsome salutations to each other.
It connected by a narrow crevice with another cave, and it was through this that we regained the open air.
With the blade of his knife he drove them tightly into every crevice around windows and door.
One part was open, and by that I had crept in; but now I covered every crevice by which I might be perceived with stones and wood, yet in such a manner that I might move them on occasion to pass out; all the light I enjoyed came through the sty, and that was sufficient for me.
He looked through the crevice thus produced, between the door and the post, before he ventured into the room himself.
These words so alarmed Mombi that she quickly transformed herself from a shadow to a Black Ant, in which shape she crawled along the ground, seeking a crack or crevice in which to hide her tiny body.
They stole cautiously, and with beating hearts, to a crevice, through which the faint light of the fire was glimmering.
So in solitude I came round by the ravine of the Beast People, and hiding among the weeds and reeds that separated this crevice from the sea I watched such of them as appeared, trying to judge from their gestures and appearance how the death of Moreau and Montgomery and the destruction of the House of Pain had affected them.
It rains very seldom, but during a short portion of the year heavy torrents fall, and immediately afterwards a light vegetation springs out of every crevice.
Holding by the door-handle, he peeped through a crevice of the curtain, and saw that the inner door, communicating with the passage towards the parlor, was closed.
It is but a month since they were married, and the rice still lingers in the crevices of the pathway down to the quaint old iron-work gate.