criminal conversation


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criminal conversation

n. Law
An act of adultery that gives rise to a cause of action on the part of the injured spouse.

criminal conversation

n
1. (Law) (formerly) a common law action brought by a husband by which he claimed damages against an adulterer
2. (Law) another term for adultery
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.criminal conversation - extramarital sex that willfully and maliciously interferes with marriage relationscriminal conversation - extramarital sex that willfully and maliciously interferes with marriage relations; "adultery is often cited as grounds for divorce"
extramarital sex, free love - sexual intercourse between individuals who are not married to one another
References in classic literature ?
When the husband prosecutes his wife's gallant, if he can produce any proofs of a criminal conversation, he recovers for damages forty cows, forty horses, and forty suits of clothes, and the same number of other things.
Another measure would have cut the statute of limitations from six to four years in cases involving real estate, injury to personal property, criminal conversation, fraud and similar matters.<br />Wardlow says tort reform remains an important issue and if a bill gets introduced while he is AG, he might testify in support.
The third option is still available in some states through actions euphemistically titled "alienation of affection" and "criminal conversation." This Note tackles their constitutionality in light of the Supreme Court's growing body of jurisprudence dealing with intimate relations and marital status.
In 1793, he was sued by a Dr Bromel for 'criminal conversation' with Mrs Bromel on the staircase of their house in Newcastle.
There were three main forums in which the adultery case could be tried in English law: the ecclesiastical courts, principally the Consistory Court and the Court of Arches at Doctors' Commons, which entailed the presentation by legal representatives of the parties of previously recorded depositions of witnesses before a judge who could record a sentence of separation from bed and board without the right of remarriage; the civil courts, in the form of a case for criminal conversation by which a husband could sue an adulterer for the loss of consortium in his wife; and finally, Parliament, where a husband could obtain a divorce by a private act which allowed for remarriage.
ey called it criminal conversation. Garrow's reaction to that was what your reaction and mine is now."
The final chapter, by Joanne Bailey, presents a gendered assessment of eighteenth-century parenting through the novel use of court cases dealing with cruelty, adultery, and "criminal conversation." This critical analysis reveals that throughout the second half of the eighteenth century increasing attention was devoted to fatherhood.
Gallantry and Criminal Conversation (2002) is a sublime example of the European Grand Tour run amuck, in which several couples and a trio indulge in X-rated frivolity.
Unfurled: flare weed compatriot, that criminal conversation.
The last three chapters take up, in turn, the popular literature of domestic homicide, adultery in the church courts, and cases of "criminal conversation." Chapter four's connection of murder narratives to popular novelistic modes is particularly persuasive, explaining how pamphleteers were pandering to a reading audience who expected titillating private details about adultery and crimes of passion even more than public moral lessons.
Adultery, or "criminal conversation" as it was legally described, had become a crime and not a sin.
In her analysis of Persuasion, Linda Bree has some fascinating remarks on the links between verbal conversation and "criminal conversation," the eighteenth-century term for adultery: "any too private conversation could soon become prey to constructions or misconstructions of sexual transgression" (151).