criminology

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crim·i·nol·o·gy

 (krĭm′ə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The scientific study of crime, criminals, criminal behavior, and corrections.

[Italian criminologia : Latin crīmen, crīmin-, accusation; see crime + Latin -logia, -logy.]

crim′i·no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
crim′i·no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
crim′i·nol′o·gist n.

criminology

(ˌkrɪmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Law) the scientific study of crime, criminal behaviour, law enforcement, etc. See also penology
[C19: from Latin crimin- crime, -logy]
criminological, ˌcriminoˈlogic adj
ˌcriminoˈlogically adv
ˌcrimiˈnologist n

crim•i•nol•o•gy

(ˌkrɪm əˈnɒl ə dʒi)

n.
the sociological study of crime and criminals.
[1855–60; < Latin crīmin-, s. of crīmen (see crime) + -o- + -logy]
crim`i•no•log′i•cal (-nlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
crim`i•no•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
crim`i•nol′o•gist, n.

criminology

the scientific study of crime and criminals. — criminologist, n. — criminologic, criminological, adj.
See also: Crime

criminology

The study of crime and the behavior of criminals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.criminology - the scientific study of crime and criminal behavior and law enforcement
sociology - the study and classification of human societies
penology, poenology - the branch of criminology concerned with prison management and prisoner rehabilitation
Translations
kriminologiarikosoppi
kriminologija

criminology

[ˌkrɪmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ] Ncriminología f

criminology

[ˌkrɪmɪˈnɒlədʒi] ncriminologie f

criminology

nKriminologie f

criminology

[ˌkrɪmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ] ncriminologia
References in periodicals archive ?
We present introductory steps and examples of existing approaches that may help to illustrate the potential for a realist/idealist dialectic that integrates and synthesizes criminologies of the present and the future.
This edition has an updated list of facts about crime, expanded theories of victimization, inclusion of the new definition of rape from the FBI, discussion of rape and sexual assault on campus and the misuse of prescription drugs, and a new chapter on crime in specific contexts and emerging criminologies, including green, queer, popular, and catastrophic criminologies.
The section concerned with the last of these is particularly impressive, which reviews not only Left Realist critiques of Administrative and Left Idealist criminologies, but also considers criticisms levelled at New Left Realism itself.