crinoid


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to crinoid: class Crinoidea, Sea lilies

cri·noid

 (krī′noid′)
n.
Any of various echinoderms of the class Crinoidea, including the sea lilies and feather stars, that are characterized by a cup-shaped body, feathery radiating arms, and either a stalk or a clawlike structure with which they are able to attach to a surface.

[From New Latin Crinoīdea, class name : Greek krinon, lily + Greek -oeidēs, -oid.]

cri′noid′ adj.

crinoid

(ˈkraɪnɔɪd; ˈkrɪn-)
n
(Animals) any primitive echinoderm of the class Crinoidea, having delicate feathery arms radiating from a central disc. The group includes the free-swimming feather stars, the sessile sea lilies, and many stemmed fossil forms
adj
1. (Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the Crinoidea
2. shaped like a lily
[C19: from Greek krinoeidēs lily-like]
criˈnoidal adj

cri•noid

(ˈkraɪ nɔɪd, ˈkrɪn ɔɪd)

n.
1. any echinoderm of the class Crinoidea, having a cup-shaped body with branched radiating arms, comprising the sea lilies and feather stars.
adj.
2. lilylike.
[1825–35; < Greek krinoeidḗs=krín(on) lily + -oeidēs -oid]
cri•noi′dal, adj.

cri·noid

(krī′noid′)
Any of various invertebrate sea animals having a cup-shaped body, feathery arms, and a stalk by which they attach themselves to a surface. Sea lilies and feather stars are types of crinoids.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crinoid - primitive echinoderms having five or more feathery arms radiating from a central diskcrinoid - primitive echinoderms having five or more feathery arms radiating from a central disk
echinoderm - marine invertebrates with tube feet and five-part radially symmetrical bodies
sea lily - crinoid with delicate radiating arms and a stalked body attached to a hard surface
comatulid, feather star - free-swimming stalkless crinoid with ten feathery arms; found on muddy sea bottoms
Adj.1.crinoid - of or relating to or belonging to the class Crinoidea
References in periodicals archive ?
Nervous system development of two crinoid species, the sea lily Metacrinus rotundus and the feather star Oxycomanlhus japonicus.
Isolated crinoid ossicles, reflecting complete post-mortem disarticulation of individuals during extended residence within the taphonomically active zone (Lewis 1980), represent one of the most abundant bioclasts in the Paleozoic rock record (Lowenstam 1957; Ausich 1997).
In either case, fossilized bivalves, crinoid fragments, gastropods, shark teeth, sea urchin spines, fish bones, coral, fossilized traces (tracks, burrows, etc.) and other marine fossils may be identified.
and Sebek, O.: 1997, Chemical composition of the crinoid skeletal remains (Echinodermata) in weathered limestones of the Bohemian Lower Devonian (Barrandian area).
War Eagle Cavern--Features an underground stream, an abundance of crinoid fossils, unusual dome pits, onyx and much more.
If their crinoid ancestors spent their entire adult lives similarly anchored to one spot, they could not have spread worldwide without help.
I personally like going across the road to Crinoid Hill to hunt for marine fossils.
Although most crinoid fossils are from "spindly, plant-like animals anchored to sea floor rocks," the 1 to 4 millimeter star-shaped parts of these crinoids that the scientists dug up were used to grab and hold onto objects but were not found attached to anything.
These differences included (1) two species, sand star and black crinoid, whose densities differed between energized and unenergized cables, (2) three species, thin sea pen, red octopus, and white sea urchin, which differed between cable sides, (3) seven species, white-plumed anemone, spot prawn, thin sea pen, California sea cucumber, red octopus, Urticina spp., and black crinoid, which exhibited bottom depth differences, and (4) two species, thin sea pen and sand star, whose densities varied among years.
Inspect them closely and you may make out the curve of a gastropod, the cone-shaped shell of a cephalopod, or a disc or rod-like structure that was once a piece of a crinoid stem.
Crinoids tended to grow on the edges of the reefs, so reef limestone is usually surrounded by limestone containing many crinoid fossils.