crinoline

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Related to crinolines: Crinolette

crin·o·line

 (krĭn′ə-lĭn)
n.
1. A coarse stiff fabric, originally of cotton and horsehair, used especially to line and stiffen hats and garments.
2. A petticoat made of this fabric.
3. A hoop skirt.

[French, from Italian crinolino : crino, horsehair (from Latin crīnis, hair; see sker- in Indo-European roots) + lino, flax (from Latin līnum; see lī̆no- in Indo-European roots).]

crin′o·line, crin′o·lined (-lĭnd) adj.

crinoline

(ˈkrɪnəlɪn)
n
1. (Textiles) a stiff fabric, originally of horsehair and linen used in lining garments
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a petticoat stiffened with this, worn to distend skirts, esp in the mid-19th century
3. (Clothing & Fashion) a framework of steel hoops worn for the same purpose
[C19: from French, from Italian crinolino, from crino horsehair, from Latin crīnis hair + lino flax, from Latin līnum]

crin•o•line

(ˈkrɪn l ɪn)

n.
1. a stiff, coarse fabric, often of cotton, used as interlining or for support in garments, hats, etc.
2. a petticoat of crinoline or other stiff material worn to bell out an overskirt.
3. a hoop skirt.
[1820–30; < French < Italian crinolino=crino horsehair (« Latin crīnis hair) + lino flax < Latin līnum; compare linen]

crinoline

A stiff linen fabric used in the past to line and stiffen clothes, or a petticoat made of this.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crinoline - a skirt stiffened with hoopscrinoline - a skirt stiffened with hoops  
hoop - a light curved skeleton to spread out a skirt
skirt - a garment hanging from the waist; worn mainly by girls and women
2.crinoline - a full stiff petticoat made of crinoline fabric
half-slip, petticoat, underskirt - undergarment worn under a skirt
3.crinoline - a stiff coarse fabric used to stiffen hats or clothing
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Translations

crinoline

[ˈkrɪnəliːn] Nmiriñaque m, crinolina f

crinoline

[ˈkrɪnəlɪn] ncrinoline f

crinoline

nKrinoline f

crinoline

[ˈkrɪnəliːn] ncrinolina
References in classic literature ?
March had one of his vague visions of ladies in cloudy crinolines and gentlemen in outlandish hats and whiskers revisiting that lost garden like ghosts.
He talked of pink and pig-skin breeches, of foxes at Ring's Bottom, where now the County Council pauper lunatics were enclosed, of Lady Bone's chintzes and crinolines.
The superb stiff folds of the crinolines suited the women; the cloaks and hats of the gentlemen seemed full of character.
I say, Marya Vassilievna, you were making out those fly-away crinolines were not being worn.
Amongst them, I remarked some women, dressed from the hips to knees in quite a crinoline of herbs, that sustained a vegetable waistband.
Considering these things, we can hardly think Dinah and Seth beneath our sympathy, accustomed as we may be to weep over the loftier sorrows of heroines in satin boots and crinoline, and of heroes riding fiery horses, themselves ridden by still more fiery passions.
I remember that the Baroness was clad in a voluminous silk dress, pale grey in colour, and adorned with flounces and a crinoline and train.
The reader will remember how I met Lord John Roxton upon the very occasion when, in his protective crinoline, he had gone to bring the "Devil's chick" as he called it, for Professor Challenger.
on thoroughbred horses; lounges at the club; has to keep clear of crinoline vortices; gets its science done by Faraday, and its religion by the superior clergy who are to be met in the best houses,--how should it have time or need for belief and emphasis?
She was dressed up in a crinoline, a mantle and a straw hat with a flame-coloured feather in it, all very old and shabby.
The classic comic duo, Maggie Fox and Sue Ryding, just couldn't resist the urge to dust off their crinolines, wear flattering bonnets and sit at rained-lashed windows in a pale and decorative manner.
This leaves us in a bizarre cultural position, for whilst the soundtrack of the season will always be 1973, the images will remain that of Dickens, with Victorian revellers in crinolines and top hats watching urchins skate on iced over ponds .