critical altitude


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critical altitude

The altitude beyond which an aircraft or airbreathing guided missile ceases to perform satisfactorily. See also altitude.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 231's critical altitude is only 14,000 feet, while the 252's critical altitude is 24,000 feet.
In an ICE with a two-stage turbocharger (see Figure 1), the LP stage turbocharger is designed to provide the HP stage with a higher air pressure than the ambient at a given altitude, thereby increasing the critical altitude of the engine [19].
A turbocharger will easily fix this--at least until you climb beyond the turbo installation's critical altitude. But expect a progressively higher-than-normal pitch attitude and sluggish control response as the airplane nears its service ceiling.
There was an approximate critical altitude for variations of morphological and physiological factors near 2100 m altitude.
Starting the first day of strike training in the training command, we were taught to come off the pickle as soon as you know you can't get the bombs off before this critical altitude. As such, my brain stem kicked in, I came off the pickle, executed my safe escape, and radioed, "Cat 22, off safe, no drop."
An altimeter transmitter generates a constant FM period CW signal below a critical altitude and a variable FM period ICW signal above the critical altitude.
The weaker field can trigger breakdown only above a critical altitude. There, air molecules are sparse and electrons have plenty of runway, so they can attain breakdown speed before they slam into a molecule.
Depending on the system, the engine either can develop sea level manifold pressure up to a defined altitude--a turbonormalized engine--or it can develop higher-than-ambient manifold pressure at sea level and continue to do so up to the altitude at which the system simply can't compress the ambient air enough and manifold pressure starts to drop--the critical altitude.
In flight, one way an exhaust leak will manifest itself is through "bootstrapping"; the engine's manifold pressure will exhibit often-large variations in cruise at or near the engine's critical altitude.
Early on I learned that sinking below a critical altitude is one of the most difficult errors for me to correct.
In turbocharged airplanes manifold pressure remains constant so fuel flow remains constant as well, at least up to critical altitude. Critical altitude itself is a function of density altitude, so the height at which you can maintain climb power will be lower on a hot day.