crocus


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cro·cus

 (krō′kəs)
n. pl. cro·cus·es or cro·ci (-sī, -kī)
1.
a. Any of various perennial Eurasian herbs of the genus Crocus, having grasslike leaves and showy, variously colored flowers.
b. Any of several other plants, such as the autumn crocus.
2. A grayish to light reddish purple.
3. A dark red powdered variety of iron oxide, Fe2O3, used as an abrasive for polishing.
4. A coarse, loosely woven material like burlap, once used to make sacks for shipping saffron. See Note at gunnysack.

[Middle English, saffron, from Old French, from Latin, from Greek krokos; perhaps from a source akin to Arabic kurkum, saffron.]

crocus

(ˈkrəʊkəs)
n, pl -cuses
1. (Plants) any plant of the iridaceous genus Crocus, widely cultivated in gardens, having white, yellow, or purple flowers. See also autumn crocus
2. (Elements & Compounds) another name for jeweller's rouge
adj
(Colours) of a saffron yellow colour
[C17: from New Latin, from Latin crocus, from Greek krokos saffron, of Semitic origin]

cro•cus

(ˈkroʊ kəs)

n., pl. -cus•es.
1. any of various small bulbous plants of the genus Crocus, of the iris family, cultivated for their showy, spring-blooming flowers.
2. an orange yellow; saffron.
3. a polishing powder consisting of iron oxide.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin < Greek krókos saffron, crocus < Semitic; compare Arabic kurkum saffron]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crocus - any of numerous low-growing plants of the genus Crocus having slender grasslike leaves and white or yellow or purple flowerscrocus - any of numerous low-growing plants of the genus Crocus having slender grasslike leaves and white or yellow or purple flowers; native chiefly to the Mediterranean region but widely cultivated
iridaceous plant - any bulbous plant of the family Iridaceae
genus Crocus - a monocotyledonous genus of the family Iridaceae
Crocus sativus, saffron, saffron crocus - Old World crocus having purple or white flowers with aromatic pungent orange stigmas used in flavoring food
Translations
زَعْفَرانزَعْفران زراعي
krokus
krokus
krookus
šafran
krókusz
dverglilja, krókus
クロッカス
크로커스
crocus
krokas
krokuss
brânduşă
krókus
krokus,žafran
krokus
ดอกโครคัส
giống nghệ tây

crocus

[ˈkrəʊkəs] N (crocuses (pl)) → azafrán m

crocus

[ˈkrəʊkəs] ncrocus m

crocus

nKrokus m

crocus

[ˈkrəʊkəs] ncroco

crocus

(ˈkrəukəs) noun
a plant growing from a bulb and having brilliant yellow, purple or white flowers.

crocus

زَعْفَران krokus krokus Krokus κρόκος flores silvestres, planta del azafrán krookus crocus šafran croco クロッカス 크로커스 krokus krokus krokus açafrão, croco крокус krokus ดอกโครคัส çiğdem giống nghệ tây 番红花
References in classic literature ?
Crocus would that evening deliver a lecture on Phrenology for the benefit of the Belleville public; at a charge, for admission, of so much a head.
Doctor Crocus is here, gentlemen, the celebrated Dr.
Upon which Doctor Crocus, who is a tall, fine-looking Scotchman, but rather fierce and warlike in appearance for a professor of the peaceful art of healing, bursts out of the concourse with his right arm extended, and his chest thrown out as far as it will possibly come, and says:
Whereupon Doctor Crocus and I shake hands; and Doctor Crocus looks as if I didn't by any means realise his expectations, which, in a linen blouse, and a great straw hat, with a green ribbon, and no gloves, and my face and nose profusely ornamented with the stings of mosquitoes and the bites of bugs, it is very likely I did not.
Doctor Crocus makes no verbal answer, but gives me an imploring look, which says so plainly 'Will you ask me that again, a little louder, if you please?
As hinds or heifers in spring time, when sated with pasture, bound about a meadow, so they, holding up the folds of their lovely garments, darted down the hollow path, and their hair like a crocus flower streamed about their shoulders.
All we were playing in a lovely meadow, Leucippe (9) and Phaeno and Electra and Ianthe, Melita also and Iache with Rhodea and Callirhoe and Melobosis and Tyche and Ocyrhoe, fair as a flower, Chryseis, Ianeira, Acaste and Admete and Rhodope and Pluto and charming Calypso; Styx too was there and Urania and lovely Galaxaura with Pallas who rouses battles and Artemis delighting in arrows: we were playing and gathering sweet flowers in our hands, soft crocuses mingled with irises and hyacinths, and rose-blooms and lilies, marvellous to see, and the narcissus which the wide earth caused to grow yellow as a crocus.
There followeth, for the latter part of January and February, the mezereon-tree, which then blossoms; crocus vernus, both the yellow and the grey; primroses, anemones; the early tulippa; hyacinthus orientalis; chamairis; fritellaria.
And Aunt Plenty gave a perplexed shake of the head which caused great commotion among the stiff loops of purple ribbon that bristled all over the cap like crocus buds.
cried she, and stretched her hands out over a little blue crocus, that hung quite sickly on one side.
Some must have the flowering crocus, the wood-starring dogwood, the voice of bluebird--even so gross a reminder as the farewell handshake of the retiring buckwheat and oyster before they can welcome the Lady in Green to their dull bosoms.
They like crocus and hyacinth time best of all, as they are partial to a bit of colour, but tulips (except white ones, which are the fairy-cradles) they consider garish, and they sometimes put off dressing like tulips for days, so that the beginning of the tulip weeks is almost the best time to catch them.