crocus

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cro·cus

 (krō′kəs)
n. pl. cro·cus·es or cro·ci (-sī, -kī)
1.
a. Any of various perennial Eurasian herbs of the genus Crocus, having grasslike leaves and showy, variously colored flowers.
b. Any of several other plants, such as the autumn crocus.
2. A grayish to light reddish purple.
3. A dark red powdered variety of iron oxide, Fe2O3, used as an abrasive for polishing.
4. A coarse, loosely woven material like burlap, once used to make sacks for shipping saffron. See Note at gunnysack.

[Middle English, saffron, from Old French, from Latin, from Greek krokos; perhaps from a source akin to Arabic kurkum, saffron.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

crocus

(ˈkrəʊkəs)
n, pl -cuses
1. (Plants) any plant of the iridaceous genus Crocus, widely cultivated in gardens, having white, yellow, or purple flowers. See also autumn crocus
2. (Elements & Compounds) another name for jeweller's rouge
adj
(Colours) of a saffron yellow colour
[C17: from New Latin, from Latin crocus, from Greek krokos saffron, of Semitic origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cro•cus

(ˈkroʊ kəs)

n., pl. -cus•es.
1. any of various small bulbous plants of the genus Crocus, of the iris family, cultivated for their showy, spring-blooming flowers.
2. an orange yellow; saffron.
3. a polishing powder consisting of iron oxide.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin < Greek krókos saffron, crocus < Semitic; compare Arabic kurkum saffron]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crocus - any of numerous low-growing plants of the genus Crocus having slender grasslike leaves and white or yellow or purple flowerscrocus - any of numerous low-growing plants of the genus Crocus having slender grasslike leaves and white or yellow or purple flowers; native chiefly to the Mediterranean region but widely cultivated
iridaceous plant - any bulbous plant of the family Iridaceae
genus Crocus - a monocotyledonous genus of the family Iridaceae
Crocus sativus, saffron, saffron crocus - Old World crocus having purple or white flowers with aromatic pungent orange stigmas used in flavoring food
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
زَعْفَرانزَعْفران زراعي
krokus
krokus
krookus
šafran
krókusz
dverglilja, krókus
クロッカス
크로커스
crocus
krokas
krokuss
brânduşă
krókus
krokus,žafran
krokus
ดอกโครคัส
giống nghệ tây

crocus

[ˈkrəʊkəs] N (crocuses (pl)) → azafrán m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

crocus

[ˈkrəʊkəs] ncrocus m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

crocus

nKrokus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

crocus

[ˈkrəʊkəs] ncroco
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

crocus

(ˈkrəukəs) noun
a plant growing from a bulb and having brilliant yellow, purple or white flowers.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

crocus

زَعْفَران krokus krokus Krokus κρόκος flores silvestres, planta del azafrán krookus crocus šafran croco クロッカス 크로커스 krokus krokus krokus açafrão, croco крокус krokus ดอกโครคัส çiğdem giống nghệ tây 番红花
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
And what do you mean by pulling up the crocuses and snowdrops, eh sir?'
'And do you suppose HE minds such things as crocuses?' demanded John.
Wherefore she was taken faint directly; and being duly presented with the crocuses and snowdrops, divined on further consideration that they were the occasion of the languor which had seized upon her spirits.
4-18) Apart from Demeter, lady of the golden sword and glorious fruits, she was playing with the deep-bosomed daughters of Oceanus and gathering flowers over a soft meadow, roses and crocuses and beautiful violets, irises also and hyacinths and the narcissus, which Earth made to grow at the will of Zeus and to please the Host of Many, to be a snare for the bloom-like girl -- a marvellous, radiant flower.
All we were playing in a lovely meadow, Leucippe (9) and Phaeno and Electra and Ianthe, Melita also and Iache with Rhodea and Callirhoe and Melobosis and Tyche and Ocyrhoe, fair as a flower, Chryseis, Ianeira, Acaste and Admete and Rhodope and Pluto and charming Calypso; Styx too was there and Urania and lovely Galaxaura with Pallas who rouses battles and Artemis delighting in arrows: we were playing and gathering sweet flowers in our hands, soft crocuses mingled with irises and hyacinths, and rose-blooms and lilies, marvellous to see, and the narcissus which the wide earth caused to grow yellow as a crocus.
It was that rich afternoon sunlight that loves to flash into teacups as though they were crocuses, that loves to run a golden finger along the beautiful wrinkles of old faces and light up the noble hollows of age-worn eyes; the sunlight that loves to fall with transfiguring beam on the once dear book we never read, or, with malicious inquisitiveness, expose to undreamed- of detection the undusted picture, or the gold- dusted legs of remote chairs, which the poor housemaid has forgotten.
There is no amaranth, no pomegranate here, But can your heart forget the Christmas rose, The crocuses and snowdrops once so dear?
Flowers peeped out amongst the leaves; snow- drops, crocuses, purple auriculas, and golden-eyed pansies.
"You won't believe me," she added, "there is no colour like it in England." She adopted, indeed, a condescending tone towards that poor island, which was now advancing chilly crocuses and nipped violets in nooks, in copses, in cosy corners, tended by rosy old gardeners in mufflers, who were always touching their hats and bobbing obsequiously.
The Prince, on his way back from his usual before-breakfast stroll, lingered for a short time amongst the beds of hyacinths and yellow crocuses. Somehow or other, these spring flowers, stiffly set out and with shrivelled edges--a little reminiscent of the last east wind--still seemed to him, in their perfume at any rate, to being him memories of his own country.
There were beds of crocuses and hyacinths, fragrant clumps of violets, borders of snowdrops, masses of primroses and early anemones.
Mother Nature normally provides the extra water autumn crocuses require in spring and early summer but if dry conditions occur, supplemental watering is necessary.