cross-bench


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cross-bench

n
(Parliamentary Procedure) (usually plural) Brit a seat in Parliament occupied by a neutral or independent member
ˈcross-ˌbencher n
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A cross-bench group of councillors was set up in the wake of the decision to launch a fresh bid to both the UK and Welsh Governments to release further money.
The Committee will consist of five members of the Legislative Assembly, including three Government members and at least one cross-bench member, and five members of the Legislative Council, including two Government members and at least two cross bench members.
The cross-bench peer added: "A child poor enough to qualify for free school meals in the London borough of Hackney is still three times more likely to go to university than a similarly disadvantaged child in Hartlepool in County Durham.
The cross-bench peer insisted Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn must "recant and repent" over remarks regarding Zionism which, he claimed, risked engulfing the UK "in the flames of hatred".
Berwick Conservative MP Ann-Marie Trevelyan and cross-bench peer Lord Mackenzie of Framwellgate have also signed the letter.
Sugar sits as a cross-bench peer in the House of Lords after quitting the Labour Party in 2015, saying he was "disillusioned" at the direction of the party.
that if i sit still for too long in this chamber, I'll stand up to discover my clothes have been turned into lace Cross-bench peer Lord Vaux of Harrowden wants the Lords fumigated to get rid of the moths
Gordon was expelled from Labor to sit on the cross-bench just months after the 2015 election, when it emerged he had not declared a juvenile criminal history when applying to be a candidate.
However, he is a cross-bench peer, which means he is not affiliated to any political party.
It further adds that "the government is urgently trying to quell a potential rebellion after the scale of cross-bench cooperation over the EU withdrawal bill intensified, with newer MPs called in for meetings with chief whip Gavin Williamson".
Former CBI director general Digby Jones, a cross-bench peer as Lord Jones of Birmingham, claimed allowances of PS10,800 and travel expenses of PS3,291 in the 12 months from May 2016 to April 2017.
But the comments provoked an angry response from Ukip and Tory politicians who accused the cross-bench peer of showing "contempt" for Britons.