cross-examination


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Related to cross-examination: direct examination

cross-ex·am·ine

(krôs′ĭg-zăm′ĭn, krŏs′-)
tr.v. cross-ex·am·ined, cross-ex·am·in·ing, cross-ex·am·ines
1. Law To question (a witness already questioned by the opposing side) regarding matters brought out during foregoing direct examination.
2. To question (a person) closely, especially with regard to answers or information given previously.

cross′-ex·am′i·na′tion n.
cross′-ex·am′in·er n.

cross′-examina`tion


n.
1. the act of cross-examining: The attorney's cross-examination was particularly aggressive.
2. the state of being cross-examined: The witness collapsed under cross-examination.
[1825–30]

cross-examination

The questioning by a lawyer of a witness who has already been questioned by the opposing side, especially with a view to discrediting the witness’s testimony.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cross-examination - (law) close questioning of a hostile witness in a court of law to discredit or throw a new light on the testimony already provided in direct examinationcross-examination - (law) close questioning of a hostile witness in a court of law to discredit or throw a new light on the testimony already provided in direct examination
interrogatory, examination, interrogation - formal systematic questioning
cross-question - a question asked in cross-examination
leading question - a question phrased in such a way as to suggest the desired answer; a lawyer may ask leading questions on cross-examination
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations

cross-examination

[ˈkrɒsɪgˌzæmɪˈneɪʃən] N (Jur) → repreguntas fpl (fig) → interrogatorio m

cross-examination

[ˈkrɒsɪgˌzæmɪˈneɪʃn] n (Law) → interrogatorio in contraddittorio, controinterrogatorio

cross2

(kros) plural ˈcrosses noun
1. a symbol formed by two lines placed across each other, eg + or x.
2. two wooden beams placed thus (+), on which Christ was nailed.
3. the symbol of the Christian religion.
4. a lasting cause of suffering etc. Your rheumatism is a cross you will have to bear.
5. the result of breeding two varieties of animal or plant. This dog is a cross between an alsatian and a labrador.
6. a monument in the shape of a cross.
7. any of several types of medal given for bravery etc. the Victoria Cross.
verb
1. to go from one side to the other. Let's cross (the street); This road crosses the swamp.
2. (negative uncross) to place (two things) across each other. He sat down and crossed his legs.
3. to go or be placed across (each other). The roads cross in the centre of town.
4. to meet and pass. Our letters must have crossed in the post.
5. to put a line across. Cross your `t's'.
6. to make (a cheque or postal order) payable only through a bank by drawing two parallel lines across it.
7. to breed (something) from two different varieties. I've crossed two varieties of rose.
8. to go against the wishes of. If you cross me, you'll regret it!
cross-
1. going or placed across. cross-winds; cross-pieces.
2. of mixed variety. a cross-breed.
ˈcrossing noun
1. a place where a road etc may be crossed. a pedestrian-crossing; a level-crossing.
2. a journey over the sea. I was seasick as it was a very rough crossing.
ˈcrossbow noun
a medieval type of bow fixed to a shaft with a mechanism for pulling back and releasing the string.
ˈcross-breed noun
an animal bred from two different breeds.
ˈcross-bred adjective
ˌcrossˈcheck verb
to check information, calculations etc by using different sources or a different method.
noun
the act of crosschecking.
cross-ˈcountry adjective
across fields etc, not on roads. a cross-country run.
ˌcross-country ˈskiing noun
the sport of skiing with narrow skis across the countryside, through woods etc.
ˌcross-exˈamine verb
in a court of law, to test or check the previous evidence of (a witness) by questioning him.
ˈcross-exˌamiˈnation noun
ˌcross-ˈeyed adjective
having a squint.
ˈcross-fire noun
the crossing of lines of gunfire from two or more points.
at cross-purposes
of two or more people, confused about what they are saying or doing because of misunderstanding one another. I think we're talking at cross-purposes.
ˌcross-reˈfer verb
to give a cross-reference (to). In this dictionary went is cross-referred to go.
ˌcross-ˈreference noun
a reference from one part of a book, list etc to another, eg crept see creep.
ˈcrossroads noun singular
a place where two or more roads cross or meet. At the crossroads we'll have to decide which road to take.
ˌcross-ˈsection noun
1. (a drawing etc of) the area or surface made visible by cutting through something, eg an apple.
2. a sample as representative of the whole. He interviewed a cross-section of the audience to get their opinion of the play.
crossword (puzzle)
a square word-puzzle in which the blanks in a pattern of blank and solid checks are to be filled with words reading across and down, the words being found from clues.
cross one's fingers
to place a finger across the one next to it, for good luck.
cross out
to draw a line through. He crossed out all her mistakes.
References in classic literature ?
It was not shaken on cross-examination, and it was plainly unfavorable to the prisoner.
He now rejoiced in the possession of a small weapon with which he could prostrate his com- rade at the first signs of a cross-examination.
But Sir Ernest's cross-examination was yet to come.
Phunky had sat down when Serjeant Snubbin had winked at him, or if Serjeant Buzfuz had stopped this irregular cross-examination at the outset (which he knew better than to do; observing Mr.
Don't you think, monsieur, that this cross-examination has lasted long enough?
Garrow, whose subtle cross-examination of witnesses and masterly, if sometimes startling, methods of arriving at the truth seemed more thrilling to us than any novel.
We dived into the City, and came up in a crowded policecourt, where a blood-relation (in the murderous sense) of the deceased with the fanciful taste in brooches, was standing at the bar, uncomfortably chewing something; while my guardian had a woman under examination or cross-examination - I don't know which - and was striking her, and the bench, and everybody present, with awe.
I'm not saying that if I'd got the right kind of testimony out of their witnesses on cross-examination, that friendship would have decided the case.
A voice directed me to satisfy my hunger and to feed my calot, and while I was thus engaged my invisible host put me through a severe and searching cross-examination.
That odious man, Major Thomson, put me through a regular cross-examination again, and I had to tell him at last--"
Even Sachs might break down in cross-examination, and you
So vast was the excitement that for some weeks the Press really told the truth; and the reports of examination and cross-examination, if interminable, even if intolerable are at least reliable.