cross-linguistically

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Adv.1.cross-linguistically - by comparing languages; "she studied the phenomenon cross-linguistically"
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Nevertheless, as a rule, there is cross-linguistically no problem distinguishing lexical from prototypical grammatical forms.
Literature on the universality of the Determiner Phrase has been divided between those who claim it to be present cross-linguistically and those who argue that it is parameterized--that languages without articles do not project the Determiner Phrase layer.
Research on idioms has highlighted the three main properties of such expressions cross-linguistically: idiomaticity, stability and lexicalization (see Fellbaum 2011, Moon 1998, and Cacciari 1993, among others, for English; Groza 2005, Hristea 1984, and others, for Romanian).
The majority of researchers collaborated in the European research network COST Action A33 "Cross-Linguistically Robust Stages of Children's Linguistic Performance" (2006--2010).
The papers represent a selection of contributions to the 2011 SLE workshop 'The argument/adjunct distinction cross-linguistically' organized by myself, Iren Hartmann, Andrej Malchukov, Martin Haspelmath, and Bernard Comrie (all from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology) under the auspices of the Leipzig Valency Classes Project, which has been funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.
Zddrapa's general thesis is that when HY is examined through the methodological lenses of cognitive grammar and radical construction grammar, it "does not differ cross-linguistically from other linguistic innovations" (p.
The first chapter explains ditransitive constructions, "...formulating a cross-linguistically applicable definition" and offering a typological overview of sentences with Agent, Theme, and Recipient arguments and read, in English, like this: Mary gave John a pen.
"There is tremendous variation in pragmatic behaviors cross-culturally and cross-linguistically," said Dr.
Serial verb constructions are found cross-linguistically in many languages of the world.
In this section I attempt to place the data from Norwegian Para Romani in a diachronic-semantic frame, as well as referring to what is known on parallel developments cross-linguistically. In addition, I explore the possibility that the use of case-inflected pronouns as default person markers in Para-Romani may be connected to the use of non-canonical person markers in certain Indo-Aryan languages.
This note presents a simple, novel diagnostic for determining the phrase structural status of negative markers cross-linguistically, a topic of enduring interest (for recent approaches anal references see Haegeman; Zanuttini; Giannakidou, Landscape and Polarity).
More specifically, is it possible for a particular type of language structure to serve as an optimum in speech adaptation cross-linguistically? A series of papers by Robert Munroe et al.
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