crossable

crossable

(krɒsəbəl)
adj
able to be crossed
References in periodicals archive ?
During periods of heavy rain, fords which are usually easily crossable can become perilous.
The possibility that the line between the living and the dead is both thin and crossable provides the groundwork for Kato's possession by his mother's spirit.
Features include: Soft stretch jersey fabric; adjustable, padded and crossable straps; a combination of seamless padded moulding technology (inner bra) and compression (outer bra top layer); and adjustable underbust width.
"When I'm scouting, I constantly use my GPS to mark sign, and I also use it to mark shallow areas in creeks that seem to be crossable," Scott explains.
This project is part of the reconquest of public space along the banks of the garonne and crossable connection on the isle of ramier.
I left "Freedom Village" a little sad about those bereaved by the Korean War, a little hopeful that the DMZ will be crossable some day, and a little irritated by how artists turn to exclusion zones (think of ChimfPom's Don't Follow the Wind, 2015-, project in Fukushima, Japan) as a way to renew old figments of their profession as a special class of visionaries and intrepid explorers of the unknown.
South Waziristan Region Commander Major General Nauman Zakaria said, "most of the area which is crossable, which is more critical, sensitive from our point of view, from Afghan's point of view, where the control lacks, from their side, is going to be completely fenced.
'Most of the area which is crossable, which is more critical, sensitive, from our point of view, from Afghan brothers' point of view, where the control is lax from their side, is going to be completely fenced,' the commander further said.
Boyd defines social networking sites as "a group of websites having profile, public comments on the profile, and a crossable social network expressed by public" (2006).
Providing a detailed analysis of the semantic shift of Jewishness in antiquity, Cohen reconstructs the permeable boundaries between Jews and non-Jews: "In their minds and actions the Jews erected a boundary between themselves and the rest of community, the non-Jews ("gentiles"), but the boundary was always crossable and not always clearly marked." (35) In my opinion, the dialectic mechanism proposed by Miles and Brown can be found even in ancient texts, albeit in a flexible manner.
In this process, the hitherto discrete categories of national belonging and gender identity are crossable for the individual.
The six parents used in this study (except Nubaria 1) were crossable in both directions (as females and as males).