crossways


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cross·wise

 (krôs′wīz′, krŏs′-)
adv. also cross·ways (-wāz′)
So as to be or lie in a cross direction; across: placed the kindling crosswise to the rest of the wood.
adj.
Crossing: a crosswise piece.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.crossways - transverselycrossways - transversely; "the marble slabs were cut across"
References in classic literature ?
"Well, sir, we can't drive over that tree, nor yet get round it; there will be nothing for it, but to go back to the four crossways, and that will be a good six miles before we get round to the wooden bridge again; it will make us late, but the horse is fresh."
'The Egoist' (1879) and 'Diana of the Crossways' (1885) are among his other strongest books.
When they had got on some way they came to four crossways, each leading to a different country.
"We must arrange the table crossways, sir, at the end of the room," he said.
It swam crossways in the direction of the Nautilus with great speed, watching us with its enormous staring green eyes.
Like many of the hunters he has a mark in his mould, in order to know the work his rifle performs; and here you see it plainly--six little holes, laid crossways."
He pulled the cart crossways, and held down his whip.
Messieurs Musketeers, I will not have this haunting of bad places, this quarreling in the streets, this swordplay at the crossways; and above all, I will not have occasion given for the cardinal's Guards, who are brave, quiet, skillful men who never put themselves in a position to be arrested, and who, besides, never allow themselves to be arrested, to laugh at you!
She acted them for days at a time, greatly to Helen's amusement; and then it would be Meredith's turn and she became Diana of the Crossways. But Helen was aware that it was not all acting, and that some sort of change was taking place in the human being.
Adam remembered well the night of shame and anguish when he first saw his father quite wild and foolish, shouting a song out fitfully among his drunken companions at the "Waggon Overthrown." He had run away once when he was only eighteen, making his escape in the morning twilight with a little blue bundle over his shoulder, and his "mensuration book" in his pocket, and saying to himself very decidedly that he could bear the vexations of home no longer--he would go and seek his fortune, setting up his stick at the crossways and bending his steps the way it fell.
He flung it from him quickly and it dropped crossways just behind the great snake's hood, pinning him to the floor.
When this was done I went down the ship's side, and pulling them to me, I tied four of them together at both ends as well as I could, in the form of a raft, and laying two or three short pieces of plank upon them crossways, I found I could walk upon it very well, but that it was not able to bear any great weight, the pieces being too light.