crowfoot


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crow·foot

 (krō′fo͝ot′)
n.
1. pl. crow·foots
a. Any of numerous plants of the genus Ranunculus that have palmately cleft or divided leaves.
b. Any of several other plants having leaves or other parts somewhat resembling a bird's foot.
2. pl. crow·feet (-fēt′)
a. An iron ball with four spikes arranged so that one always points upwards, used to delay the advance of mounted troops and infantry; a caltrop.
b. Nautical A set of small lines passed through holes of a batten or fitting to help support the backbone of an awning.

crowfoot

(ˈkrəʊˌfʊt)
n, pl -footspl -feetpl -feet
1. (Plants) any of several plants of the genus Ranunculus, such as R. sceleratus and R. aquatilis (water crowfoot) that have yellow or white flowers and divided leaves resembling the foot of a crow. See also buttercup
2. (Plants) any of various other plants that have leaves or other parts resembling a bird's foot
3. (Nautical Terms) nautical a bridle-like arrangement of lines rove through a wooden block or attached to a ring for supporting an awning from above
4. (Military) military another name for caltrop

crow•foot

(ˈkroʊˌfʊt)

n., pl. -foots for 1, 2, -feet for 3-6.
1. any of various plants of the genus Ranunculus, of the buttercup family, esp. one with divided leaves suggestive of a bird's foot.
3. Naut. an arrangement of ropes to support an awning.
[1400–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crowfoot - any of various plants of the genus Ranunculuscrowfoot - any of various plants of the genus Ranunculus
genus Ranunculus, Ranunculus - annual, biennial or perennial herbs: buttercup; crowfoot
meadow buttercup, Ranunculus acris, tall buttercup, tall crowfoot, tall field buttercup - perennial European buttercup with yellow spring flowers widely naturalized especially in eastern North America
common buttercup, Ranunculus bulbosus - perennial Old World buttercup with golden to sulphur yellow flowers in late spring to early summer; naturalized in North America
Mount Cook lily, Ranunculus lyalii, mountain lily - showy white-flowered perennial of New Zealand
Ranunculus occidentalis, western buttercup - perennial of western North America
creeping buttercup, creeping crowfoot, Ranunculus repens - perennial European herb with long creeping stolons
celery-leaved buttercup, cursed crowfoot, Ranunculus sceleratus - annual herb growing in marshy places
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Translations

crowfoot

[ˈkrəʊfʊt] N (crowfoots (pl)) → ranúnculo m

crowfoot

n (Bot) → Hahnenfuß m
References in classic literature ?
There the water-flower was the lily; the crowfoot here.
The featured guest for the free event will be My Ha Crowfoot, an account manager from ReferenceUSA.
"With California facing unprecedented wildfire risk, we need every tool available to put the state on a path toward long-term wildfire prevention and forest health," California Secretary for Natural Resources Wade Crowfoot said in a statement.
The application proposed putting a 714 square metre shop on the site which was currently occupied by Crowfoot carriers, on the corner of Chapel and Brook Street.
The focus of PowwowFashions is to showcases the beauty of Jingle Dance dresses being worn at the National Indigenous Cultural Exposition (NICE) 2018 Powwow held in Edmonton, Canada thanks to NICE photographer Bert Crowfoot of Edmonton.
The only British woman to have won a Nobel Prize for Science, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin was among the first to use X-ray crystallography to reveal the structure of antibiotics, vitamins and proteins such as cholesterol, penicillin, Vitamin B12 and insulin.
Or try Ranunculus Aquatilis (Common Water Crowfoot) for pretty white buttercup-shaped flowers popping up above lobed floating leaves.
The Molecules section, on the other hand, allows visitors to build their own models of molecules, view the finished models of simple and complex molecules, or watch a film about British biological chemist Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, who received the Nobel Prize for outlining how several complex molecules are structured.
Northumberland National Park Mountain Rescue Team took part in the hunt for water crowfoot plants, which are an indicator of unpolluted streams and rivers.
The book is filled with quotes and messaged from notable Native Americans such as: Chief Crowfoot, Crazy Horse, Chief Seattle, Chief Tecumseh (Crouching Tiger), Chief Dan George, Sitting Bull, Mourning Dove, Black Elk, Luther Standing Bear, and many others.