crown-of-thorns


Also found in: Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

crown-of-thorns

(kroun′əv-thôrnz′)
n.
1.
a. A trailing or climbing spiny shrub (Euphorbia milii) native to Madagascar and cultivated as a houseplant, having showy flower clusters with usually red, petallike bracts.
b. The Christ's thorn.
2. A spiny starfish (Acanthaster planci) of the Pacific and Indian Oceans that feeds on coral polyps.

crown-of-thorns

n
1. (Animals) a starfish, Acanthaster planci, that has a spiny test and feeds on living coral in coral reefs
2. (Plants) Also called: Christ's thorn a thorny euphorbiaceous Madagascan shrub, Euphorbia milii var. splendens, cultivated as a hedging shrub or pot plant, having flowers with scarlet bracts
References in periodicals archive ?
An outbreak of the poisonous crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS) has been reported in the sea off several coastal barangays of Malitbog, Southern Leyte.
Runoff from recent floods in northern Australia is flowing onto parts of the Barrier Reef, scientists said Friday, starving coral of light and providing fodder for the predatory crown-of-thorns starfish.
The crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS), which is native to Australia, is one of world's largest seastars, measuring up to 1 metre.
According to officials, the two-day campaign saw divers dive deep into the sea to remove the 'Crown-of-Thorns Star Fish' because the species harms the coral reef.
It feeds on toxic animals such as crown-of-thorns starfish.
Frydenberg said the money would be spent on improving water quality, tackling the crown-of-thorns starfish, and helping develop new species of coral that are more resilient to warmer temperatures.
In recent years, the reef has lost 30% of its coral due to bleaching linked to rising sea temperatures and damage from crown-of-thorns starfish.
AT the same stakeholders' forum, dive shop owners expressed fear that funding for their program to battle crown-of-thorns infestation around Boracay Island will run dry.
It has suffered extensive damage over the past few years, mostly from coral bleaching, crown-of-thorns starfish infestation, and the effects of climate change.
Crown-of-thorns starfish, a native species whose numbers occasionally grow so out of control they endanger the reef, have been detected on 37 sections of the southerly Swain Reef, more than 60 miles offshore, according to the park authority.
But pests in the ocean are partly responsible for the depletion of the reefs coral cover--the crown-of-thorns starfish is blamed for 40% of the coral decline.