crozier


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cro·zier

 (krō′zhər)
n.
Variant of crosier.

crozier

(ˈkrəʊʒə)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a variant spelling of crosier

cro•sier

or cro•zier

(ˈkroʊ ʒər)

n.
1. a ceremonial staff carried by a bishop or an abbot, hooked at one end like a shepherd's crook. See illus. at cope 2.
2. the coiled tip of a plant part, as a fern frond.
[1350–1400; short for crosier-staff; Middle English crocer staff-bearer < Anglo-French (Middle French crossier). See crosse, -er2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crozier - a staff surmounted by a crook or cross carried by bishops as a symbol of pastoral officecrozier - a staff surmounted by a crook or cross carried by bishops as a symbol of pastoral office
staff - a rod carried as a symbol
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Being buttoned up in a tightish blue surtout, with a buff waistcoat and gray trousers, he had something of a military air, but he announced himself at the Crozier (the orthodox hotel, where he put up with a portmanteau) as an idle dog who lived upon his means; and he farther announced that he had a mind to take a lodging in the picturesque old city for a month or two, with a view of settling down there altogether.
But the Crozier being an hotel of a most retiring disposition, and the waiter's directions being fatally precise, he soon became bewildered, and went boggling about and about the Cathedral Tower, whenever he could catch a glimpse of it, with a general impression on his mind that Mrs.
His Honour the Mayor will bear with me, if for a moment I have been deluded into occupying his time, and have forgotten the humble claims upon my own, of my hotel, the Crozier.
Datchery to himself that night, as he looked at his white hair in the gas-lighted looking-glass over the coffee-room chimneypiece at the Crozier, and shook it out: 'For a single buffer, of an easy temper, living idly on his means, I have had a rather busy afternoon
The priest tore off his tiara, broke his crozier, and rent his tinsel cope.
Over this dreadful face, its dust and decay and its mocking grin, hung a crown sown thick with flashing brilliants; and upon the breast lay crosses and croziers of solid gold that were splendid with emeralds and diamonds.
There were Virgins and bishops there, above their natural size, made of solid silver, each worth, by weight, from eight hundred thousand to two millions of francs, and bearing gemmed books in their hands worth eighty thousand; there were bas-reliefs that weighed six hundred pounds, carved in solid silver; croziers and crosses, and candlesticks six and eight feet high, all of virgin gold, and brilliant with precious stones; and beside these were all manner of cups and vases, and such things, rich in proportion.
For their prelates; when they are proud and great, there is also danger from them; as it was in the times of Anselmus, and Thomas Becket, Archbishops of Canterbury; who, with their croziers, did almost try it with the king's sword; and yet they had to deal with stout and haughty kings, William Rufus, Henry the First, and Henry the Second.
His toys were crowns and miters and croziers and swords of state; and he had lingered over them, telling himself that the boy ought to see all the sights of London.
in the 1940s, early in his academic career, French sociologist Michel Crozier found work relations and politics in that country to be more pragmatic and less polarized than in Europe.
Wilmot Crozier, who farmed near Osceola in Polk County, Neb.
A third foster child in Crozier's care - a five-year-old girl - said Crozier assaulted her in 2002.