cruel

(redirected from cruelest)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

cru·el

 (kro͞o′əl)
adj. cru·el·er, cru·el·est or cru·el·ler or cru·el·lest
1. Disposed to inflict pain or suffering: a cruel tyrant.
2. Causing or characterized by severe pain, suffering, or distress: cruel treatment; a cruel remark.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin crūdēlis; see kreuə- in Indo-European roots.]

cru′el·ly adv.
cru′el·ness n.

cruel

(ˈkruːəl)
adj
1. causing or inflicting pain without pity: a cruel teacher.
2. causing pain or suffering: a cruel accident.
[C13: from Old French, from Latin crūdēlis, from crūdus raw, bloody]
ˈcruelly adv
ˈcruelness n

cru•el

(ˈkru əl)

adj. -er, -est.
1. willfully causing pain or distress to others.
2. enjoying the pain or distress of others.
3. causing or marked by great pain or distress.
4. unrelentingly severe; merciless; brutal.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin crūdēlis=crūd(us) (see crude) + -ēlis adj. suffix]
cru′el•ly, adv.
cru′el•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cruel - (of persons or their actions) able or disposed to inflict pain or sufferingcruel - (of persons or their actions) able or disposed to inflict pain or suffering; "a barbarous crime"; "brutal beatings"; "cruel tortures"; "Stalin's roughshod treatment of the kulaks"; "a savage slap"; "vicious kicks"
inhumane - lacking and reflecting lack of pity or compassion; "humans are innately inhumane; this explains much of the misery and suffering in the world"; "biological weapons are considered too inhumane to be used"

cruel

adjective
2. bitter, severe, painful, ruthless, traumatic, grievous, unrelenting, merciless, pitiless Fate dealt him a cruel blow.
Quotations
"I must be cruel, only to be kind" [William Shakespeare Hamlet]

cruel

adjective
1. Showing or suggesting a disposition to be violently destructive without scruple or restraint:
2. So intense as to cause extreme suffering:
Translations
أليم ، قاسِقاسٍقاسي القَلب، عَديم الرّحْـمَـه
жесток
krutýsurovýukrutný
ondforfærdeliggrusom
julma
nirdayi
nečovječanokrutan
kegyetlen
kejam
miskunnarlaus; grimmuròjáningarfullur
残酷な
잔혹한
crudelis
negailestingasskaudusskaudžiai
cietsirdīgsnežēlīgssāpīgssmags
crud
krutokruten
grym
dhalimu
โหดร้าย
zalimacı verenacımasızçekilmez
tàn nhẫn

cruel

[ˈkrʊəl] ADJ (crueller (compar) (cruellest (superl))) → cruel
they were very cruel to herfueron muy crueles con ella
it's a cruel factes un hecho brutal
you have to be cruel to be kindquien bien te quiere te hará llorar

cruel

[ˈkruːəl] adj
[person] → cruel(le); [treatment] → cruel(le); [joke, hoax] → cruel(le)
to be cruel to sb [person] → être cruel(le) envers qn
[life, world, reality, fact] → cruel(le)
a cruel irony → une ironie cruelle
a cruel blow → un coup très dur
a cruel twist of fate → un cruel caprice du sort
you have to be cruel to be kind → qui aime bien châtie bien

cruel

adjgrausam (to zu); remark, wit, critic, winter alsounbarmherzig; to be cruel to animalsein Tierquäler sein; to be cruel to one’s dogseinen Hund quälen; that is cruel to animalsdas ist Tierquälerei; don’t be cruel!sei nicht so gemein!; sometimes you have to be cruel to be kindmanchmal ist es letzten Endes besser, wenn man hart ist

cruel

[ˈkrʊəl] adj (-ler (comp) (-lest (superl))) cruel (to or towards)crudele (con or nei confronti di)

cruel

(ˈkruːəl) adjective
1. pleased at causing pain; merciless. He was cruel to his dog.
2. causing distress. a cruel disappointment.
ˈcruelly adverb
ˈcruelty noun

cruel

قاسٍ krutý ond grausam σκληρός cruel julma cruel okrutan crudele 残酷な 잔혹한 wreed grusom okrutny cruel жестокий grym โหดร้าย zalim tàn nhẫn 残忍的

cruel

a. cruel, inhumano-a.

cruel

adj cruel
References in classic literature ?
It was the cruelest exhibition--the most wanton, the most unfeeling.
As soon as she had a little recollected her spirits, and somewhat composed herself with a cordial, she began to inform the company of the manifold injuries she had received from her husband; who, she said, was not contented to injure her in her bed; but, upon her upbraiding him with it, had treated her in the cruelest manner imaginable; had tore her cap and hair from her head, and her stays from her body, giving her, at the same time, several blows, the marks of which she should carry to the grave.
But the memory of that race remained for long in his heart, the cruelest and bitterest memory of his life.
For this reason, and also because a relative at Iggensbach had bequeathed M400 ($100) to the boy, the heartless father considered him in the way; so the unnatural parents determined to sacrifice him in the cruelest possible manner.
The lowest, cruelest, and worst populace of a city, never without its quantity of low, cruel, and bad, were the directing spirits of the scene: noisily commenting, applauding, disapproving, anticipating, and precipitating the result, without a check.
We returned to Constantinople, and the following year, seventy-three, it became known that Don John had seized Tunis and taken the kingdom from the Turks, and placed Muley Hamet in possession, putting an end to the hopes which Muley Hamida, the cruelest and bravest Moor in the world, entertained of returning to reign there.
From that moment on he was the cruelest of the cruel, and I am awaiting the day when he shall win the goal of his ambition, and feel the carcass of Tal Hajus beneath his foot, for I am as sure that he but waits the opportunity to wreak a terrible vengeance, and that his great love is as strong in his breast as when it first transfigured him nearly forty years ago, as I am that we sit here upon the edge of a world-old ocean while sensible people sleep, John Carter.
For two years his faith was spurned, his zeal denied recognition, his charities taken in ill part, and he remained a prisoner to one of the cruelest tribes of the Nyambarra, the object of every species of maltreatment.
A cruel enemy--the cruelest enemy a woman could have
I am in search of a man who has done me the cruelest wrong that one human creature can inflict on another.
To Raleigh, this was the cruelest blow fate ever dealt him, for with the death of Prince Henry died his hope of freedom.
Buckingham regarded her as a coquette deserving the cruelest tortures, and De Guiche looked upon her as a divinity; the courtiers as a star whose light might some day become the focus of all favor and power.