crusado


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cru·sa·do

(kro͞o-sä′dō) also cru·za·do (-zä′-)
n. pl. cru·sa·does or cru·sa·dos also cru·za·does or cru·za·dos
An old Portuguese coin of gold or silver having a cross pictured on the reverse.

[Portuguese, from past participle of cruzar, to mark with a cross, from cruz, cross, from Latin crux, cruc-.]

crusado

(kruːˈseɪdəʊ) or

cruzado

n, pl -does or -dos (-dəʊz; Portuguese -duʃ)
(Currencies) a former gold or silver coin of Portugal bearing on its reverse the figure of a cross
[C16: literally, marked with a cross, from cruzar to bear a cross; see crusade]

cru•sa•do

(kruˈseɪ doʊ) also

cruzado



n., pl. -does, -dos.
an early Portuguese coin of gold or silver, bearing the figure of a cross.
[1535–45; < Portuguese cruzado crossed, marked with a cross. See cross, -ate1]
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References in periodicals archive ?
In Simon Hull's words, this is an "aesthetic of aestheticism." (27) Nothing is represented once, but rather reiterated and relished: "societarian reformation" is an "Alcides' club"; "the bugbear mendicity" is represented by "Scrips, wallets, bags" by "the mendicant fraternity" and by the Miltonic "Genius." The next paragraph opens in the same fashion, with a chain of synonyms for the removal of mendicity: "I do not approve of this wholesale going to work, this impertinent crusado, or helium ad exterminationem" (2:126).
GOMEZ CRUSADO BLANCO 2014, |RIOJA, SPAIN (PS12.99, laithwaites.co.uk) - A natural bedfellow with paella, this lightly oaked Rioja offers a delicious richness that can cope with the weight of the rice, saffron and shellfish.
Gomez Crusado Blanco 2014, Rioja, Spain |(PS12.99, www.laithwaites.co.uk) A natural bedfellow with paella, this lightly oaked Rioja offers a delicious richness that can cope with the weight of the rice, saffron and shellfish.
Gomez Crusado Blanco 2014, Rioja, Spain (PS12.99, www.laithwaites.co.uk): A natural bedfellow with paella, this lightly oaked rioja offers a delicious richness that can cope with the weight of the rice, saffron and shellfish.
Which country formerly had a gold coin called a crusado or cruzado?
(15) Barnes also printed Skeltonicall Salutation, or Condigne Gratulation | And Just Vexation | Of the Spanish Nation, | That in a Bravado, | Spent Many a Crusado | In Setting Forth an Armado | England to Invado (Oxford, 1589), anonymous lines that condemn the 'factione Guisiana' and, like De caede, pun on 'Medicis' [Catherine de] Medicis and as 'doctor', the 'Chirugis avaris' (sig.