cryptogenic


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Related to cryptogenic: cryptogenic epilepsy

cryp·to·gen·ic

 (krĭp′tə-jĕn′ĭk) also cryp·tog·e·nous (krĭp-tŏj′ə-nəs)
adj.
Of obscure or unknown origin. Used of diseases.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cryptogenic

(ˌkrɪptəʊˈdʒɛnɪk)
adj
(Pathology) (esp of diseases) of unknown or obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cryp•to•gen•ic

(ˌkrɪp təˈdʒɛn ɪk)

adj.
of obscure or unknown origin, as a disease.
[1905–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

cryp·to·gen·ic

a. criptogénico, de causa desconocida.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cryptogenic

adj criptogénico
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cause of about one-third of all strokes is undetermined; these are called cryptogenic strokes.
Although the effects of ASA are not fully understood, they may be a possible risk factor for an unexplained ("cryptogenic") stroke, since the occurrence is higher in patients undergoing echo in this setting.
While there aren't many head-to-head trials to guide treatment choice, the results of one prospective, randomized, open-label study of 333 patients with cryptogenic sensory polyneuropathy was presented by Barohn and colleagues at the 2018 annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, he said.
Ergo, a diagnosis of cryptogenic ischemic stroke was made, and aspirin 300 mg was added to the therapy.
Also, 5 years ago, the patient was diagnosed with cryptogenic cirrhosis.
The combining hypothesis for the association of PFO with numerous clinical conditions such as cryptogenic stroke, migraine, sleep apnea, pulmonary edema due to high altitude, platypnea-orthodeoxia, decompression sickness (DCS), is based on the passage of a particulate, gas bubble, or chemical substance in venous circulation to systemic circulation without being exposed to the lungs through a right-to-left shunt.
Considering the treatment response (Table-IV), complete response was almost similar in both groups (symptomatic 27% vs cryptogenic 28%) whereas partial response (50% vs 64%) and no response (22.8% vs 7.1%) were different in cryptogenic/idiopathic and symptomatic group but it was not significant (p-value 0.41).
described that bronchus Dieulafoy's disease accounted for at least 6% of the patients undergoing surgery for hemoptysis overall and up to 55% of the patients undergoing surgery for hemoptysis presumed to be cryptogenic.[4] Therefore, this diagnostic option should be considered when the patient has recurrent massive hemoptysis which cannot be explained otherwise.
The cone-beam CT technique used in the present study for the determination of feeding vessels is not suitable for cases such as cryptogenic hemoptysis and diffuse aspergillosis, in which preprocedural CT is unable to demonstrate or confirm the exact target lesions associated with hemoptysis.
In the literature, however, only limited case reports involving recurrent acute cryptogenic hepatitis are available (7).
Objective: To compare the efficacy of anti-platelets and anti-coagulants in patients with cryptogenic stroke in prevention of recurrent stroke and TIA.