cubitus

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cubitus

(ˈkjuːbɪtəs)
n
1. (Anatomy) the elbow
2. (Units) the lower arm from elbow to fingertip
3. (Zoology) zoology obsolete the fourth leg joint in hexapods

cu•bi•tus

(ˈkyu bɪ təs)

n., pl. -ti (-ˌtaɪ)
the forearm.
[1820–30; < New Latin, Latin, variant of cubitum cubit]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cubitus - hinge joint between the forearm and upper arm and the corresponding joint in the forelimb of a quadrupedcubitus - hinge joint between the forearm and upper arm and the corresponding joint in the forelimb of a quadruped
musculus articularis cubiti - a small branch of the triceps that inserts into the capsule of the elbow joint
arm - a human limb; technically the part of the superior limb between the shoulder and the elbow but commonly used to refer to the whole superior limb
ginglymoid joint, ginglymus, hinge joint - a freely moving joint in which the bones are so articulated as to allow extensive movement in one plane
crazy bone, funny bone - a point on the elbow where the ulnar nerve passes near the surface; a sharp tingling sensation results when the nerve is knocked against the bone; "the funny bone is not humerus"
2.cubitus - the arm from the elbow to the fingertips
limb - one of the jointed appendages of an animal used for locomotion or grasping: arm; leg; wing; flipper
Translations

cu·bi·tus

n. L. cubitus, cúbito, hueso interno del antebrazo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Various skeletal anomalies can be appreciated radiographically such as delayed bone growth and maturation, clinodactyl 5th finger and/or toe, fused carpals (usually the hamate and capitate), fused 5th and 6th metacarpals, defect on the lateral surface of the proximal part of the tibia (or knock-knees), cubitus valgus, and hypoplastic cubitus, most of which were found in our patient too.
Some authors have suggested that a carrying-angle loss greater than 10 is not acceptable and that the ideal difference should be less than 5,6,8 because the most important late complication after paediatric supracondylar humerus fractures is the development of cubitus varus or cubitus valgus deformity.