cul-de-sac


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cul-de-sac

 (kŭl′dĭ-săk′, ko͝ol′-)
n. pl. cul-de-sacs or culs-de-sac (kŭlz′-, ko͝olz′-)
1.
a. A dead-end street, especially one ending in a circular turnaround.
b. A circular turnaround at the end of a dead-end street.
c. An impasse: "This was the cul-de-sac the year kept driving me toward: men and women would always be at odds" (Philip Weiss).
2. Anatomy A saclike cavity or tube open only at one end.

[French : cul, bottom (from Old French, from Latin cūlus; see culet) + de, of (from Old French, from Latin ; see de-) + sac, sack (from Old French, from Latin saccus; see sack1).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cul-de-sac

(ˈkʌldəˌsæk; ˈkʊl-)
n, pl culs-de-sac or cul-de-sacs
1. (Human Geography) a road with one end blocked off; dead end
2. an inescapable position
3. (Anatomy) any tube-shaped bodily cavity or pouch closed at one end, such as the caecum
[C18: from French, literally: bottom of the bag]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cul-de-sac

(ˈkʌl dəˈsæk, -ˌsæk, ˈkʊl-)

n., pl. culs-de-sac.
1. a blind alley; dead-end street.
2. any situation in which further progress is impossible.
3. a saclike anatomical cavity or tube open at only one end, as the cecum.
[1730–40; < French: literally, bottom of the sack]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cul-de-sac

- Literally French for "bottom of a sack," it also means "situation from which there is no escape"; it can be pluralized as cul-de-sacs or culs-de-sac.
See also related terms for sack.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

cul-de-sac

noun dead end, blind alley The factory was set at the end of a cul-de-sac.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

cul-de-sac

noun
A course leading nowhere:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

cul-de-sac

[ˈkʌldəˈsæk] (culs-de-sac, cul-de-sacs (pl)) N (lit) → calle f sin salida, calle f cortada (fig) → callejón m sin salida
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cul-de-sac

[ˈkʌldəsæk] n (= road) → cul-de-sac m, impasse f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cul-de-sac

nSackgasse f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cul-de-sac

[ˈkʌldəˈsæk] nvicolo cieco
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

cul-de-sac

(ˈkaldəsӕk) noun
a street closed at one end.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
In that cul-de-sac I was caught like a bear in a pen.
It seems as innocent of a destination as a boy on an errand; but, after taking at least six times as long as any other road in the kingdom for its amount of work, you usually find it dip down of a sudden into some lovely natural cul-de-sac, a meadow-bottom surrounded by trees, with a stream spreading itself in fantastic silver shallows through its midst, and a cottage half hidden at the end.
THAT Pierre Bon-Bon was a restaurateur of uncommon qualifications, no man who, during the reign of , frequented the little Câfé in the cul-de-sac Le Febvre at Rouen, will, I imagine, feel himself at liberty to dispute.
To enter the little Cafe in the cul-de-sac Le Febvre was, at the period of our tale, to enter the sanctum of a man of genius.
I have said that "to enter the Cafe in the cul-de-sac Le Febvre was to enter the sanctum of a man of genius" - but then it was only the man of genius who could duly estimate the merits of the sanctum.
He thought of the stray amours to which he had been introduced by Flanagan, the sly visits to houses in a cul-de-sac, with the drawing-room in Utrecht velvet, and the mercenary graces of painted women.
Having been recently refurbished, this five-bedroomed detached house in Ullswater Place, Cannock, has a large rear garden and lies in a cul-de-sac position.
The woman in her seventies and man in his sixties were found fatally wounded at their house in a cul-de-sac in Whitton, south-west London.
Sharon said: "The picture is the cul-de-sac at the bottom of Beaumont Road in Shelthorpe.
Despite possible short term difficulties, Israel should seize on the impending collapse of the Palestinian Authority as an opportunity to extricate itself from the deadly cul-de-sac, into which the Oslo process has lured it.
Purchase of the parcels was contingent on the Village of Glen Ellyn vacating the Hillcrest Avenue cul-de-sac that currently divides the park and on the property being void of any environmental issues.