culex

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cu·lex

 (kyo͞o′lĕks′)
n. pl. cu·li·ces (-lĭ-sēz′)
Any of various mosquitoes of the genus Culex, which includes the common house mosquito (C. pipiens) and species that spread diseases such as West Nile virus. Also called culex mosquito.

[Latin, gnat.]

culex

(ˈkjuːlɛks)
n, pl -lices (-lɪˌsiːz)
(Animals) any mosquito of the genus Culex, such as C. pipiens, the common mosquito
[C15: from Latin: midge, gnat; related to Old Irish cuil gnat]

cu•lex

(ˈkyu lɛks)

n., pl. -li•ces (-ləˌsiz)
any of numerous mosquitoes constituting the genus Culex, standing with the body parallel to surfaces, including the common house mosquito, C. pipiens.
[1825–50; < New Latin (Linnaeus); Latin: gnat, midge]
cu′li•cine` (-ləˌsaɪn) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.culex - type genus of the Culicidae: widespread genus of mosquitoes distinguished by holding the body parallel to the resting surfaceCulex - type genus of the Culicidae: widespread genus of mosquitoes distinguished by holding the body parallel to the resting surface
arthropod genus - a genus of arthropods
common mosquito, Culex pipiens - common house mosquito
Culex fatigans, Culex quinquefasciatus - widespread tropical mosquito that transmits filarial worms
References in periodicals archive ?
montis Apulia notos / ostentare," 77-78), geographic peculiarities of villages and towns ("venit vilissima rerum / hic aqua, sed panis longe pulcherrimus" 88-89), a description of ill-equipped inns ("hospitio modico," 2; "villula tectum / praebuit," 45-46, "lachrimoso non sine fumo," 80) infested by bothersome insects and cacophonous frogs ("mali culices ranaeque palustres," 14), fights among drunk country bumpkins (11-13), and even the description of a local fatuous ("insanus") dandy whom Horace is happy to leave behind (34-36).
montis Apulia notos / ostentare," 77-78), geographic peculiarities of villages and towns ("venit vilissima rerum / hic aqua, sed panis longe pulcherrimus" 88-89), a description of ill-equipped inns ("hospitio modico," 2; "villula tectum / proebuit," 45-46, "lachrimoso non sine fumo," 80) infested by bothersome insects and cacophonous frogs ("mali culices ranoeque palustres," 14), fights among drunk country bumpkins (11-13), and even the description of a local fatuous ("insanus") dandy whom Horace is happy to leave behind (34-36).