cultch

cultch

 (kŭlch)
n.
Variant of culch.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cultch

(kʌltʃ)
n
(Zoology) a variant spelling of culch
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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/ Particle type Particle Vol.) Whole market-size oyster shell 5.39 Limestone, square- base pyramid, #57 2.69 Limestone, triangular prism, #4 2.11 Limestone, cube, #4 2.66 Limestone, square- base pyramid, #4 1.88 Limestone, triangular- base pyramid, #4 3.28 Limestone, triangular- base pyramid, #57 2.21 Limestone, triangular prism, #57 1.91 Limestone, cube, #57 1.99 Oyster cultch (mostly fragments) 1.69 Particle types are defined in Table 1.
Finally, although many restored reefs may be too young to have produced a geohistorical record and some techniques, such as planting loose cultch, could make it difficult to identify shells produced by restored reefs, comparing restoration metrics between restored reefs and nearby natural death assemblages could help evaluate whether the restoration achieved its goals.
Alternatives to clam and oyster shell as cultch for eastern oysters.
lurida were more than twice as likely to settle on cultch placed 0.3 m below MLLW than 0.3 m above, and juvenile oysters experienced over 50% mortality after air exposure (2% 10% of the time) (Trimble et al.
The 2012 Stock Assessment (Louisiana Department of Wildlife & Fisheries 2012) included, for the first time, quantitative estimates of the quality and quantity of the cultch. Brown (surface) and black (muddy, buried) substrate were collected from 1-[m.sup.2] grids and weighed.
Natural resources damage assessment: oyster reef restoration in Apalachicola Bay: purchase and placement of oyster cultch material.
The reasons for the increase are attributed to the commercial industry controlling two main oyster predators, starfish, Asterias forbesi, and the oyster drills, Urosalpinx cinerea and Eupleura caudata, and spreading much larger quantities of shells to be used as cultch for setting oyster larvae (MacKenzie, 1981).
This assertion is demonstrated by introducing artificial defects in a bearing in cultch casing on input shaft and pinion gear in fifth speed on output shaft for automotive gearbox.
Upon hauling, the contents of the dredge, known as cultch (term also applies to spat settlement substrate), is sorted and oysters [greater than or equal to] MLS are retained.