cultural cringe


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cultural cringe

n
(Sociology) the perception that one's own culture is inferior to that of another group or country
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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In a country that is prone to the idea it is somehow inferior to others -- the infamous Scottish 'cultural cringe' -- we have nonetheless gradually created the world's biggest arts festival, a joyous event that includes everything from avant-garde, cutting-edge drama to comedy superstars to, let's face it, rather hopeless amateur dramatics (important to note that sometimes, it's the am-dram that sticks in the memory).
In John's lifespan, Scotland often looked more likely to welcome the cultural cringe, adopt a more "English" version of affairs, and willingly finish the job of erasing ourselves.
The old cultural cringe has fallen away, the familiar no longer breeding contempt, but something closer to pride.
Despite a slight cultural cringe in Australia that 'everything must be better over there', in reality Australia has been ahead of the game in many areas of scholarly communication.
Cultural cringe, in cultural studies and social anthropology, is an internalized inferiority complex that causes people in a country to dismiss their own culture as inferior to the cultures of other countries.
It is then the purpose of this paper to explore this line of research by investigating the relationship between cultural cringe and consumer behaviors in China.
Hughes called this sense of inadequacy "the Cultural Cringe," the assumption that what one wrote or painted or carved "is of unknown value until it is judged by people outside your own society." This sense of "cultural colonialism," of being an interloper, never left him.
Fernando cultivates no cultural cringe, however, styling his people (in one of his early missives) as 'Lords and Ladies of Australia' (p.20).
Ffordd goadwy Nigel Jenkins o - a disgrio cymhlethdodau iaith ei deulu - a ddaeth o Sir Gar i wneud arian da yn Abertawe - oedd "cultural cringe".
"Gaelic" only crawled into Ireland as a cultural cringe term for the language in the late nineteenth century among a class of people who didn't want to admit that it belonged to the country.
Phillips in 1958 called "The Cultural Cringe." In the simplest of terms, "cultural cringe" is probably the defining barrier to a Korea not US-Americanized and not colonized, but globalized.
The establishment of the ITUC in 1894 might have reversed anglicisation, but O'Connor argues that it did not, because ITUC leaders suffered from 'mental colonisation'--a sort of 'cultural cringe'--causing them to replicate the practices of the British movement (appropriate to an industrial economy, but manifestly unsuited to Irish circumstance).

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