trauma

(redirected from cumulative trauma)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

trau·ma

 (trô′mə, trou′-)
n. pl. trau·mas or trau·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
1.
a. Serious injury to the body, as from physical violence or an accident: abdominal trauma.
b. Severe emotional or mental distress caused by an experience: He experienced trauma for years after his divorce.
2.
a. An experience that causes severe anxiety or emotional distress, such as rape or combat: memories that persist after a trauma occurs.
b. An event or situation that causes great disruption or suffering: the economic trauma of the recession.

[Greek; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

trau·mat′ic (-măt′ĭk) adj.
trau·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

trauma

(ˈtrɔːmə)
n, pl -mata (-mətə) or -mas
1. (Psychology) psychol a powerful shock that may have long-lasting effects
2. (Pathology) pathol any bodily injury or wound
[C18: from Greek: a wound]
traumatic adj
trauˈmatically adv

trau•ma

(ˈtraʊ mə, ˈtrɔ-)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
1.
a. a body wound or shock produced by physical injury, as from an accident.
b. the condition produced by this.
2. Psychiatry. psychological shock or severe distress from experiencing a disastrous event outside the range of usual experience, as rape or military combat.
3. any wrenching or distressing experience, esp. one causing a disturbance in normal functioning.
[1685–95; < Greek traûma wound]
trau•mat•ic (trəˈmæt ɪk, trɔ-, traʊ-) adj.
trau•mat′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
health problem, ill health, unhealthiness - a state in which you are unable to function normally and without pain
brain damage - injury to the brain that impairs its functions (especially permanently); can be caused by trauma to the head, infection, hemorrhage, inadequate oxygen, genetic abnormality, etc.
birth trauma - physical injury to an infant during the birth process
blast trauma - injury caused the explosion of a bomb (especially in enclosed spaces)
bleeding, haemorrhage, hemorrhage - the flow of blood from a ruptured blood vessel
blunt trauma - injury incurred when the human body hits or is hit by a large outside object (as a car)
bruise, contusion - an injury that doesn't break the skin but results in some discoloration
bump - a lump on the body caused by a blow
burn - an injury caused by exposure to heat or chemicals or radiation
dislocation - a displacement of a part (especially a bone) from its normal position (as in the shoulder or the vertebral column)
electric shock - trauma caused by the passage of electric current through the body (as from contact with high voltage lines or being struck by lightning); usually involves burns and abnormal heart rhythm and unconsciousness
fracture, break - breaking of hard tissue such as bone; "it was a nasty fracture"; "the break seems to have been caused by a fall"
cryopathy, frostbite - destruction of tissue by freezing and characterized by tingling, blistering and possibly gangrene
intravasation - entry of foreign matter into a blood vessel
penetrating injury, penetrating trauma - injury incurred when an object (as a knife or bullet or shrapnel) penetrates into the body
pinch - an injury resulting from getting some body part squeezed
rupture - state of being torn or burst open
insect bite, sting, bite - a painful wound caused by the thrust of an insect's stinger into skin
strain - injury to a muscle (often caused by overuse); results in swelling and pain
whiplash, whiplash injury - an injury to the neck (the cervical vertebrae) resulting from rapid acceleration or deceleration (as in an automobile accident)
wale, weal, welt, wheal - a raised mark on the skin (as produced by the blow of a whip); characteristic of many allergic reactions
wound, lesion - an injury to living tissue (especially an injury involving a cut or break in the skin)
wrench, pull, twist - a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments; "the wrench to his knee occurred as he fell"; "he was sidelined with a hamstring pull"
2.trauma - an emotional wound or shock often having long-lasting effectstrauma - an emotional wound or shock often having long-lasting effects
birth trauma - emotional injury inflicted on an infant by events incident to birth that is alleged to appear in symbolic form in patients with mental illness
mental condition, mental state, psychological condition, psychological state - (psychology) a mental condition in which the qualities of a state are relatively constant even though the state itself may be dynamic; "a manic state"

trauma

noun
1. shock, suffering, worry, pain, stress, upset, strain, torture, distress, misery, disturbance, ordeal, anguish, upheaval, jolt I'd been through the trauma of losing a house.
2. injury, damage, hurt, wound, agony spinal trauma

trauma

noun
1. Marked tissue damage, especially when produced by physical injury:
2. Psychiatry. Something that jars the mind or emotions:
Translations
traumavamma

trauma

[ˈtrɔːmə]
A. N (traumas, traumata (pl)) [ˈtrɔːmətə]
1. (Psych) → trauma m
2. (Med) → traumatismo m, trauma m
B. CPD trauma centre, trauma center (US) Ndepartamento m (hospitalario) de urgencias

trauma

[ˈtrɔːmə] ntraumatisme m

trauma

n (Psych) → Trauma nt, → seelischer Schock

trauma

[ˈtrɔːmə] ntrauma m

trau·ma

1. n. trauma, estado psicológico;
2. traumatismo, si se refiere a una condición física.

trauma

n (physical) trauma m, traumatismo; (psych) trauma m
References in periodicals archive ?
It's cumulative trauma which has a much more disturbing effect on young people's development.
28, Gambaro's going to share what she learned from her own experiences, as well as five years on the board of directors for the Los Angeles Repetitive Strain Injury Support Group and the Cumulative Trauma Disorders Resources Network, and in writing dozens of articles and conducting even more interviews.
Overexertion and cumulative trauma were the biggest factors in these injuries.
Alabama defines injury to include physical injury caused either by carpal tunnel syndrome disorder or by other cumulative trauma disorder if either disorder arises out of and in the course of the employment.
An important variable that has not been properly taken into account in the literature regarding the relationship between locus of control and maltreatment, and between the latter and attachment, is the impact on these associations and intersections that can result from being exposed to violence and neglect by the parents for longer or shorter periods; that is, it has never been investigated to what extent the experiences of maltreatment suffered over time can be configured as a cumulative trauma which can affect the attachment working models, the attributional processes and their intersection.
As a result of the cumulative trauma with such office jobs, primarily the soft tissue gets irritated and secondarily the bones and muscles are affected.
Building on Kira's cumulative trauma framework (2010) and evidence-supported interventions, Kira, Ashby, Lewandowski, and Omidy (2015) here present an innovative framework for trauma counseling, called Current, Continuous, and Cumulative Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CCC-TF-CBT).
The cumulative trauma from the repetitive impact of running is likely to cause further joint damage and can set the stage for future osteoarthritis.
There is more fibrotic scarring in the brain, a testament to the cumulative trauma the brain has endured.
They play a very important role in the rehabilitation of workers stricken with back and neck injuries and cumulative trauma injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome and other repetitive motion injuries.
He explains what it is, what an injured worker is entitled to, the steps of filing a claim, whether the injury is covered, cumulative trauma disorders, what to do when injured, keeping records, the insurance company's role, dealing with an employer, taking charge of medical care, medical-legal evaluations, medical benefits, temporary and permanent disability benefits, supplemental job displacement benefits, death benefits, extraordinary workers' compensation benefits and remedies, benefits and remedies outside the workers' compensation system, settling the case, the appeals board, and finding a lawyer and other resources.
According to Wittes, expatriate challenges that increase risk of failure include: back-to-back assignments (similar to the cumulative trauma seen among veterans with multiple deployments), personal/family adjustments, lack of social support, and communication barriers.

Full browser ?