cumulative

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cu·mu·la·tive

 (kyo͞om′yə-lā′tĭv, -yə-lə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Increasing or enlarging by successive addition.
2. Acquired by or resulting from accumulation.
3. Of or relating to interest or a dividend that is added to the next payment if not paid when due.
4. Law
a. Supporting the same point as earlier evidence: cumulative evidence.
b. Imposed with greater severity upon a repeat offender: cumulative punishment.
c. Following successively; consecutive: cumulative sentences.
5. Statistics
a. Of or relating to the total observed frequency of data, or the probability of a random variable, that is less than or equal to a specified value.
b. Of or relating to experimental error that increases in magnitude with each successive measurement.

cu′mu·la′tive·ly adv.
cu′mu·la′tive·ness n.

cumulative

(ˈkjuːmjʊlətɪv)
adj
1. growing in quantity, strength, or effect by successive additions or gradual steps: cumulative pollution.
2. gained by or resulting from a gradual building up: cumulative benefits.
3. (Banking & Finance) finance
a. (of preference shares) entitling the holder to receive any arrears of dividend before any dividend is distributed to ordinary shareholders
b. (of dividends or interest) intended to be accumulated if not paid when due
4. (Statistics) statistics
a. (of a frequency) including all values of a variable either below or above a specified value
b. (of error) tending to increase as the sample size is increased
ˈcumulatively adv
ˈcumulativeness n

cu•mu•la•tive

(ˈkyu myə lə tɪv, -ˌleɪ tɪv)

adj.
1. increasing or growing by accumulation or successive additions.
2. formed by or resulting from accumulation or the addition of successive elements.
3. of or pertaining to interest or dividends that, if not paid when due, become a prior claim for payment in the future.
[1595–1605]
cu′mu•la•tive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cumulative - increasing by successive additioncumulative - increasing by successive addition; "the benefits are cumulative"; "the eventual accumulative effect of these substances"
additive - characterized or produced by addition; "an additive process"

cumulative

adjective collective, increasing, aggregate, amassed, accruing, snowballing, accumulative Skin cancer can be caused by the cumulative effect of years of exposure to the sun.

cumulative

adjective
Increasing, as in force, by successive additions:
Translations
مُتراكِم، مُتَجَمِّـع
narůstající
kumulativ
fokozódóhalmozott
smávaxandi
tolydžio augantis/didėjantis
augošspieaugošs
birikerek artankümülatif

cumulative

[ˈkjuːmjʊlətɪv] ADJcumulativo

cumulative

[ˈkjuːmjʊlətɪv] adjcumulatif/ive

cumulative

adjgesamt, kumulativ (geh); the cumulative debts of ten yearsdie Schulden, die sich im Lauf von zehn Jahren angehäuft haben/hatten

cumulative

[ˈkjuːmjʊlətɪv] adjcumulativo/a
cumulative frequency (Statistics) → frequenza cumulata

cumulative

(ˈkjuːmjulətiv) adjective
becoming greater by stages or additions. This drug has a cumulative effect.

cumulative

adj acumulativo
References in periodicals archive ?
In process metaphysics in particular being is defined in terms of becoming in that "being" refers to what is common in the cumulativeness of several moments of becoming strung together in serial order.
The refutation of this assertion lies in the data, and Honorton cites the ganzfeld paradigm as providing evidence of cumulativeness, particularly drawing attention to the effects of the joint communique on the subsequent standard protocol, and the negligible effect this increased methodological rigour has had on study outcomes.
Broadly or narrowly conceived, incompatible terminology obstructs the field fostering empirical cumulativeness and undermines satisfying theoretical expectations (Lee et al.
The idea of cumulativeness, however, reflects the generally escalating framework of Canada's formal amendment rules.
2012) also echo that knowledge similarity makes knowledge absorption easier due to knowledge cumulativeness and path dependency.
Scholars try to complement the "generality" nature of GPTs, by charactering it not only with a wide range of users, but with technological cumulativeness, dynamism and complementarity innovations (Bresnahan & Trajtenberg, 1995).
Moreover, the knowledge base used was characterized by high levels of cumulativeness, which influenced the decision to join in and increased the level of dedication of all participants.