curassow


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cu·ras·sow

 (ko͝or′ə-sō′, kyo͝or′-)
n.
Any of several long-tailed, crested South and Central American game birds of the family Cracidae, related to the pheasants and domestic fowl.

[Alteration of Curaçao.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

curassow

(ˈkjʊərəˌsəʊ)
n
(Animals) any gallinaceous ground-nesting bird of the family Cracidae, of S North, Central, and South America. Curassows have long legs and tails and, typically, a distinctive crest of curled feathers. See also guan
[C17: anglicized variant of Curaçao (island)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cu•ras•sow

(ˈkyʊər əˌsoʊ, kyʊˈræs oʊ)

n.
any of several large gallinaceous birds of the guan family, esp. of the genus Crax, typically crested, with bony casques above the bill.
[1675–85; after Curaçao]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.curassow - large crested arboreal game bird of warm parts of the Americas having long legs and tailscurassow - large crested arboreal game bird of warm parts of the Americas having long legs and tails; highly esteemed as game and food
gallinacean, gallinaceous bird - heavy-bodied largely ground-feeding domestic or game birds
Crax, genus Crax - type genus of the Cracidae: curassows
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
hocomamacomuitúpajuípaujil
czubacz
References in periodicals archive ?
Population size assessment of the endangered redbilled curassow Crax blumenbachii: accouting for variation in detectability and sex-biased estimates.
There came down together, to drink, to bathe, or to fish, groups consisting of the most different classes of animals, the larger mammalia being associated with many-colored herons, palamedeas, and proudly-stepping curassow and cashew birds (Crax Alector and C.
Tracheal strictures, compression, or obstruction resolved by resection have been described in a variety of birds, including a pied imperial pigeon (Ducula bicolor), (3) ducks, (3,5) a goose (Anser species), (6) a crane (Grus species), (7) a stork (Ardeola ibis), (3) a curassow (Crux globulosa), (3) blue and gold macaws, (8,9) a barn owl (Tyto alba), (10) a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jaimaicensis), (11) and an eagle (Halieaeetus leucocephalus).
The only other bird in the area with which the photograph could be confused, would be a male great curassow (Grax rubra, MacKinnon, 2005), a common prey item on jaguar diets (Foster et al., 2010).
On 17 June 2013, along a transect through a habitat fragment of evergreen rain forest and secondary growth in the central part of the Los Tuxtlas Biosphere Reserve, we were searching for feathers of the great curassow (Crax rubra).
A Emu B Kiwi C Curassow D Black swan QUESTION 3 - for 3 points: Who sailed to America in the Mayflower?
(1) Nor were forgotten or underrated the black meat birds hunted in Brazil, such as the guan, the curassow, the fruitcrow, the toucanet, the toucan, the oropendola, the woodpecker and the seriema because "varied are the ways of preparing them";1 nor were forgotten birds such as the thrush, which should not be neglected because of its small size, "as they offer very tasty dishes".
Today, the El Paujil Nature Reserve covers 6,935 acres and provides permanent protection for 100 pairs of the critically endangered Blue-billed Curassow, as well as habitat for the Magdalena Spider Monkey, Jaguar, Spectacled Bear, and extremely rare Magdalena race of the Lowland Tapir, Tapirus terrestris columbianus.
Some organs of the razor-billed curassow (Pauxi tuberosa Spix, Cracidae) are used by a riverine community of the Oriental Amazonia in Brazil (Barros et al., 2011).